Location of Repository

Inter-species variation in colour perception

By K. Allen

Abstract

Inter-species variation in colour perception poses a serious problem for the view that colours are mind-independent properties. Given that colour perception varies so drastically across species, which species perceives colours as they really are? In this paper, I argue that all do. Specifically, I argue that members of different species perceive properties that are determinates of different, mutually compatible, determinables. This is an instance of a general selectionist strategy for dealing with cases of perceptual variation. According to selectionist views, objects simultaneously instantiate a plurality of colours, all of them genuinely mind-independent, and subjects select from amongst this plurality which colours they perceive. I contrast selectionist views with relationalist views that deny the mind-independence of colour, and consider some general objections to this strategy

Topics: 1211
Year: 2009
DOI identifier: 10.1007/s11098-007-9183-z
OAI identifier: oai:eprints.whiterose.ac.uk:5503

Suggested articles

Preview


To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.