Location of Repository

Sheer class? The impact of degree performance on graduate labour market outcomes

By Robin Naylor, Jeremy Smith and Abigail McKnight

Abstract

We exploit individual-level administrative data for whole populations of UK university students for the leaving cohorts of 1985-1993 to investigate the determinants of graduate occupational earnings. Among other results, we find that there are significant differences in the occupational earnings of leavers, according to university attended, subject studied, and degree class awarded, ceteris paribus. We also find that the premium associated with the award of a high degree class increased between 1985/6 and 1993/4, a period of substantial expansion in the graduate population. We suggest that this is consistent with a signalling model of the returns to higher education qualifications

Topics: HB, HD
Publisher: University of Warwick, Department of Economics
Year: 2002
OAI identifier: oai:wrap.warwick.ac.uk:1529

Suggested articles

Preview

Citations

  1. (1997). A first reaction to Dearing. doi
  2. (2003). Are all universities students winners in the graduate labour market?. mimeo,
  3. (2001). Determinants of degree performance in UK universities: a statistical analysis of the 1993 student cohort. doi
  4. (2002). Does the choice of university matter? Astudy of the difference across UK universities in life science students’ degree performance.
  5. (2001). Dropping-out of university: a statistical analysis of the probability of withdrawal for UK university students. J o u r n a lo ft h eR o y a lS t a t i s t i c a l Society, doi
  6. (2003). Funding higher education. doi
  7. (2003). Gender differences in student attainment: The case of university students in the UK. doi
  8. (1983). Generalised econometric models with selectivity. doi
  9. (1997). Higher education in the learning society. National committee of enquiry into higher education,
  10. (1979). Sample selection bias as a specification error. doi
  11. (1990). The earnings of economics graduates. doi
  12. (1999). The labour market returns to different types of secondary school curricula. mimeo, London School of Economics.
  13. (2000). The returns to higher education in Britain: evidence from a British cohort. doi
  14. (2002). The returns to higher education teaching.
  15. (1997). Whither higher education? An economic perspective for the Dearing committee of enquiry. doi
  16. (2002). Why is there a graduate earnings premium for students from independent schools?. doi

To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.