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Religion and mental health among Hindu young people in England

By Leslie J. Francis, Mandy Robbins, Romil Santosh and Savita Bhanot

Abstract

The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between mental health and attitude toward their religious tradition among a sample of 330 young people attending the Hindu Youth Festival in London. The participants completed the Santosh-Francis Scale of Attitude toward Hinduism together with the abbreviated form of the Revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire which provides measures of neuroticism and psychoticism. The data indicated that a more positive attitude toward Hinduism was associated with lower psychoticism scores but unrelated to neuroticism scores. There is no evidence, therefore, to associate higher levels of religiosity with poorer mental health among young people within the Hindu community

Topics: BL, BF
Publisher: Routledge
Year: 2008
OAI identifier: oai:wrap.warwick.ac.uk:2861

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