Location of Repository

Promoting positive attitudes towards science and religion among sixth-form pupils : dealing with scientism and creationism

By Jeff Astley and Leslie J. Francis

Abstract

A sample of 187 female students, attending a sixth-form study day on religious studies, completed a questionnaire containing four scales concerned with assessing: attitude toward theistic religion, attitude toward science, scientism and creationism. The data demonstrated a negative correlation between attitude toward religion and attitude toward science. However, this negative correlation was transformed into a positive correlation after taking into account individual differences in the students’ views about scientism and creationism. The implications of this finding are discussed in the context of the increasing support within society for the teaching of alternatives to evolution within the science curriculum. The authors argue both that it is important to challenge scientism by developing a better understanding of the role and limits of scientific methods, and that religious belief about creation should be recognized as essentially a claim about the ontological dependence of Nature rather than about the details of its origins and development

Topics: BR, LB
Publisher: Routledge
Year: 2010
OAI identifier: oai:wrap.warwick.ac.uk:4174

Suggested articles

Preview

Citations

  1. (1978). Attitude and longitude: a study in measurement,
  2. (1999). Attitudes towards creationism and evolutionary theory: the debate among secondary pupils attending Catholic and Protestant schools in Northern Ireland, doi
  3. (2006). BBC Survey On the Origins of Life’.
  4. (1990). Beliefs and values in science education: a Christian perspective: Part 2,
  5. (1998). C:\Users\Leslie\Desktop\Sandy Hughes\Articles\Astley\Science and Religion revised.doc 04/02/2011 20 Dawkins,
  6. (2001). C:\Users\Leslie\Desktop\Sandy Hughes\Articles\Astley\Science and Religion revised.doc 04/02/2011 21
  7. (1985). C:\Users\Leslie\Desktop\Sandy Hughes\Articles\Astley\Science and Religion revised.doc 04/02/2011 22 Moltmann,
  8. (2003). C:\Users\Leslie\Desktop\Sandy Hughes\Articles\Astley\Science and Religion revised.doc 04/02/2011 23
  9. (2001). Can a Darwinian Be a Christian? The relationship between science and religion. Cambridge: doi
  10. (2007). Children, Schools and Families. doi
  11. (1956). Christian Theology and Natural Science: some questions on their relations. doi
  12. (1992). Christianity today: the teenage experience. In doi
  13. (1951). Coefficient alpha and the internal structure of tests, doi
  14. (1998). Consilience: the unity of knowledge. doi
  15. (1991). Creationism, scientism, Christianity and science: a study in adolescent attitudes, doi
  16. (2003). Darwin’s Legacy: what evolution means today. doi
  17. (2005). Dawkins’ God: genes, memes, and the meaning of life. doi
  18. (2004). Exploring God-Talk: using language in religion. doi
  19. (2005). Fragmented Faith? Exposing the faultlines in the Church of England.
  20. (2001). From religion to science: the positive contribution of religious education to scientific understanding. In
  21. (1996). God as a principle of cosmological explanation. In
  22. (2006). God’s Action in Nature’s World: essays in honour of Robert John Russell.
  23. (2000). God’s World. doi
  24. (1988). Hardest to Accept. Coleraine:
  25. (1993). Letter to The Independent
  26. (1989). Measuring attitude towards Christianity during childhood and adolescence, Personality and Individual Differences. doi
  27. (1999). Measuring attitude towards science among secondary school students: the affective domain, doi
  28. (1953). Nature, Man and God.
  29. (2001). Rebuilding the Matrix: science and faith in the 21st century.
  30. (1998). Religion and Science: historical and contemporary issues.
  31. (2009). Religion versus Darwin: should evolution denial go to school? Theology CXII,
  32. (2001). Rocks of Ages: science and religion in the fullness of life. doi
  33. (1994). Science and Christian Belief.
  34. (1999). Science and Religion: an introduction. doi
  35. (1991). Science and Religion: some historical perspectives. Cambridge: doi
  36. (2003). Science and the Study of God: a mutuality model for theology and science. Grand Rapids, doi
  37. (1990). Science and theology in religious education, doi
  38. (1990). Science-and-religion: a challenge for secondary education, doi
  39. (1996). Science, creation and Christianity: a further look.
  40. (1995). Serious Talk: science and religion in dialogue.
  41. (1992). Teaching about issues of science and religion.
  42. (2006). The Creationists: from scientific creationism to intelligent design. doi
  43. (1976). The Great Brain Robbery. doi
  44. (2006). The Selfish Gene. doi

To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.