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Interleukin 35: A Key Mediator of Suppression and the Propagation of Infectious Tolerance

By Brian M Olson, Jeremy eSullivan and William eBurlingham

Abstract

The importance of regulatory T cells in balancing the effector arm of the immune system is well documented, playing a central role in preventing autoimmunity, facilitating graft tolerance following organ transplantation, and having a detrimental impact on the development of anti-tumor immunity. These regulatory responses use a variety of mechanisms to mediate suppression, including soluble factors. While IL-10 and TGF-β are the most commonly studied immunosuppressive cytokines, the recently identified IL-35 has been shown to have potent suppressive function in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, not only does IL-35 have the ability to directly suppress effector T cell responses, it is also able to expand regulatory responses by propagating infectious tolerance and generating a potent population of IL-35-expressing inducible regulatory T cells. In this review, we summarize research characterizing the structure and function of IL-35, examine its role in disease, and discuss how it can contribute to the induction of a distinct population of inducible regulatory T cells

Topics: induced regulatory T cells, interleukin 35, infectious tolerance, Natural regulatory T cells, iTr35, Immunologic diseases. Allergy, RC581-607
Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
Year: 2013
DOI identifier: 10.3389/fimmu.2013.00315
OAI identifier: oai:doaj.org/article:0373cc8db3f34c368faf499ef8bae000
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