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Sleep and motor learning: implications for physical rehabilitation after stroke

By Christel eGudberg and Heidi eJohansen-Berg

Abstract

Sleep is essential for healthy brain function and plasticity underlying learning and memory. In the context of physical impairment such as following a stroke, sleep may be particularly important for supporting critical recovery of motor function through similar processes of reorganisation in the brain. Despite a link between stroke and poor sleep, current approaches to rehabilitative care often neglect the importance of sleep in clinical assessment and treatment. This review assimilates current evidence on the role of sleep in motor learning, with a focus on the implications for physical rehabilitation after stroke. We further outline practical considerations for integrating sleep assessment as a vital part of clinical care

Topics: Rehabilitation, Sleep, Stroke, Ageing, consolidation, motor memory, Neurology. Diseases of the nervous system, RC346-429
Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
Year: 2015
DOI identifier: 10.3389/fneur.2015.00241
OAI identifier: oai:doaj.org/article:a9532949e9bc49f28ca451bb89247731
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