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Telephone surveys underestimate cigarette smoking among African-Americans

By Hope eLandrine, Irma eCorral, Denise Adams Simms, Scott eRoesch, Latrice ePichon, Diane eAke and Feion eVillodas


Background. This study tested the hypothesis that data from random digit-dial telephone surveys underestimate the prevalence of cigarette smoking among African-American adults. Method. A novel, community-sampling method was used to obtain a statewide, random sample of N= 2118 California (CA) African-American/Black adults, surveyed door-to-door. This Black community sample was compared to the Blacks in the CA Health Interview Survey (N = 2315), a statewide, random digit-dial telephone-survey conducted simultaneously. Results. Smoking prevalence was significantly higher among community (33%) than among telephone-survey (19%) Blacks, even after controlling for sample-differences in demographics.Conclusions. Telephone surveys underestimate smoking among African-Americans and probably underestimate other health risk behaviors as well. Alternative methods are needed to obtain accurate data on African-American health behaviors and on the magnitude of racial disparities in them

Topics: African Americans, Smoking, race, methodology, telephone health surveys, Public aspects of medicine, RA1-1270
Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
Year: 2013
DOI identifier: 10.3389/fpubh.2013.00036
OAI identifier: oai:doaj.org/article:901bdaa8be674e7598520772ad19324b
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