Location of Repository

Prosody and melody in vowel disorder

By John Harris, Jocelynne Watson and Sally Bates

Abstract

The paper explores the syllabic and segmental dimensions of phonological vowel disorder. The independence of the two dimensions is illustrated by the case study of an English-speaking child presenting with an impairment which can be shown to have a specifically syllabic basis. His production of adult long vowels displays three main patterns of deviance – shortening, bisyllabification and the hardening of a target off-glide to a stop. Viewed phonemically, these patterns appear as unconnected substitutions and distortions. Viewed syllabically, however, they can be traced to a single underlying deficit, namely a failure to secure the complex nuclear structure necessary for the coding of vowel length contrasts

Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Year: 1999
OAI identifier: oai:eresearch.qmu.ac.uk:1897

Suggested articles

Preview

Citations

  1. (1993). A case of surface constraint violation. Revue canadienne de linguistique 38.
  2. (1989). A note on vowel patterns in two normally developing children. doi
  3. (1984). A procedure for phonetic transcription by consensus.
  4. (1985). A theory of phonological weight. doi
  5. (1990). Abnormal vowel patterns in phonological disorder : some data and a hypothesis. doi
  6. (1990). Abnormal vowel patterns in phonological disorder: some data and a hypothesis. doi
  7. (1990). Acquisition of correct vowel production: A quantitative case study. doi
  8. (1990). An examination of vowel errors in phonologically disordered children. doi
  9. (1989). Atoms of segmental structure: components, gestures and dependency. doi
  10. (1997). Auditory neural processing of speech. doi
  11. (1992). Can [consonantal] spread? doi
  12. (1992). Comparing tongue positioning by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired children during vowel production. doi
  13. (1989). Compensatory lengthening in moraic phonology. doi
  14. (1988). Consonant place features.
  15. (1987). Consonant production de®cits in aphasia.
  16. (1987). Consonant production deficits in aphasia.
  17. (1995). Consonant-vowel interactions in developmental phonological disorder. Caring to communicate. The proceedings of the golden jubilee conference of the Royal College of Speech & Language Therapists.
  18. (1990). Constituent structure and government in phonology. doi
  19. (1923). Der Dialekt von Bergu X n und seine Stellung innerhalb der ra X toromanischen Mundarten Graubu X ndens. Zeitschrift fu X r romanische Philologie, Supplement 71.
  20. (1923). Der Dialekt von Bergu X n und seine Stellung innerhalb der ra X toromanischen Mundarten Graubu X ndens. Zeitschrift fu X r romanische Philologie, Supplement 71. Halle :
  21. (1992). Description and treatment of abnormal vowels.
  22. (1983). Development of phonetic, articulatory, and phonological capabilities. doi
  23. (1992). Developmental implications of nonlinear phonology. doi
  24. (1994). English sound structure. doi
  25. (1991). Feature geometry in disordered phonologies. doi
  26. (1993). Glottal transparency. doi
  27. (1998). Handbook of phonological development: from the perspective of constraint-based nonlinear phonology. doi
  28. (1996). Key aspects of declarative phonology.
  29. (1974). Linguistic orthogenesis? Scots vowel quantity and the English length conspiracy. In
  30. (1982). Misarticulated vowels : a case study. doi
  31. (1982). Misarticulated vowels: a case study. doi
  32. (1992). Models of phonological development and children with phonological disorders. doi
  33. (1976). Normal and reduced phonological space: the production of English vowels by deaf adolescents. doi
  34. (1994). On the acquisition of place.
  35. (1989). On the quantal nature of speech.
  36. (1984). Patterns of sounds. Cambridge: doi
  37. (1943). Phonetics. Ann Arbor:
  38. (1995). Phonological development. doi
  39. (1992). Phonological disability in children. (2nd edn.) doi
  40. (1995). Phonological impairment. doi
  41. (1998). Phonological universals and phonological disorder. doi
  42. (1994). Phonology in generative grammar. doi
  43. (1991). Place of articulation in consonants and vowels : a unified theory.
  44. (1991). Place of articulation in consonants and vowels: a uni®ed theory.
  45. (1980). Production de®cits in aphasia: a voice onset time analysis. doi
  46. (1980). Production deficits in aphasia : a voice onset time analysis. doi
  47. (1986). Prosodic morphology. doi
  48. (1985). Relationship between semi-vowels and vowels : crosslinguistic investigations of acoustic difference and coarticulation. doi
  49. (1985). Relationship between semi-vowels and vowels: crosslinguistic investigations of acoustic difference and coarticulation. doi
  50. (1990). Segmental complexity and phonological government. doi
  51. (1997). Sibilant-vowel co-articulation in the perception of speech by children with phonological disorder.
  52. (1971). Studies in child language and aphasia. The Hague: doi
  53. (1973). The acquisition of phonology. Cambridge: doi
  54. (1992). The acquisition of unrounded vowels in English. doi
  55. (1992). The application of nonlinear phonological theory to intervention with one phonologically disordered child. doi
  56. (1995). The elements of phonological representation.
  57. (1982). The emergence of vowels : 17 to 26 months.
  58. (1982). The emergence of vowels: 17 to 26 months.
  59. (1984). The fundamentals of Particle Phonology. doi
  60. (1995). The handbook of child language. doi
  61. (1985). The internal structure of phonological elements : a theory of charm and government. doi
  62. (1985). The internal structure of phonological elements: a theory of charm and government. doi
  63. (1997). The Queen Margaret College Cluster Acquisition Database: ®nal report.
  64. (1997). The Queen Margaret College Cluster Acquisition Database: final report.
  65. (1989). The relation between prosodic structure, syllabi®cation and segmental realization: evidence from a child with fricative stopping. doi
  66. (1989). The relation between prosodic structure, syllabification and segmental realization: evidence from a child with fricative stopping. doi
  67. (1981). The Scottish vowel-length rule. doi
  68. (1968). The sound pattern of English. doi
  69. (1991). The underspeci®cation of coronal: evidence from language acquisition and performance errors. doi
  70. (1991). The underspecification of coronal : evidence from language acquisition and performance errors. doi
  71. (1964). The vowel formants of deaf and normalhearing eleven- to fourteen-year-old boys. doi
  72. (1974). Three theses concerning phonological representations. doi
  73. (1980). Three-dimensional phonology.
  74. (1995). Towards a de®nition of schwa: an acoustic investigation of vowel reduction in English.
  75. (1995). Towards a definition of schwa: an acoustic investigation of vowel reduction in English.
  76. (1986). Towards a theory of phonological development. doi
  77. (1993). Unusual vowel systems in some Edinburgh children presenting with developmental phonological disorder.
  78. (1994). Unusual vowel systems in some Edinburgh children with phonological disorder. Paper presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention, New Orleans. Authors' addresses:
  79. (1994). Unusual vowel systems in some Edinburgh children with phonological disorder. Paper presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention, New Orleans. Authors’ addresses:
  80. (1985). Vowel harmony in Khalkha Mongolian, doi
  81. (1985). Vowel harmonyin Khalkha Mongolian, Yaka,Finnish and Hungarian. doi
  82. (1990). Vowel systems of normally developing and phonologically disordered children. doi
  83. (1992). Where's phonology? In
  84. (1992). Where’s phonology? In
  85. (1944). Yokuts language of California. New York: Viking Fund Publications in Anthropology.

To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.