Location of Repository

Using articulatory data to inform speech pathology theory and clinical practice.

By Fiona Gibbon

Abstract

This paper outlines new developments and recent research\ud in electropalatography (EPG) and discusses how they have\ud contributed to theoretical issues in speech pathology and\ud clinical practice. A central theoretical issue in speech\ud pathology is defining the articulatory processes underlying\ud speech disabilities. EPG data are providing increasing\ud evidence that abnormal speech motor control underlies at\ud least some disorders that were previously thought to have a\ud linguistic origin. The technique also provides visual\ud feedback of tongue-palate contacts, which has been shown\ud to be an effective approach to the treatment of articulation\ud disorders in children and adults. Portable units have\ud increased the effectiveness of feedback therapy because\ud they allow for more frequent practice. Recent initiatives\ud have successfully widened access to EPG therapy. Case\ud illustrations show how the new Windows® EPG provides\ud researchers and clinicians with a more technological\ud advanced system and a wider range of facilities than\ud previous versions

Publisher: Universitat AutÒnoma de Barcelona
OAI identifier: oai:eresearch.qmu.ac.uk:2245
Download PDF:
Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s):
  • http://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/224... (external link)
  • Suggested articles

    Citations

    1. (1994). A screening assessment of cleft palate speech (Great Ormond Street Speech Assessment).” doi
    2. (1994). A screening sessment of cleft palate speech (Great Ormond Street peech Assessment).” doi
    3. (1988). Acoustic properties of /k/ and /t/ in normal and phonologically disordered speech.” doi
    4. (2001). An electropalatographic investigation of middorsum palatal stops in an adult with repaired cleft palate.” doi
    5. (1997). An electropalatographic study of speech sound errors in adults with acquired aphasia.” Unpublished Ph.D. Thesis, doi
    6. (1997). An electropalatographic study of speech und errors in adults with acquired aphasia.” npublished Ph.D. Thesis, Open University/Queen argaret College,
    7. (2001). An electropalatographic vestigation of middorsum palatal stops in an adult ith repaired cleft palate.” doi
    8. (2002). Articulatory drift in the speech of children with articulation/phonological disorders”. doi
    9. (2003). Changes in linguapalatal contact patterns during therapy for velar fronting in a 10-year-old with Down's syndrome.” doi
    10. (1998). CLEFTNET cotland: a network for the treatment of cleft palate eech using EPG.” doi
    11. (1998). CLEFTNET Scotland: a network for the treatment of cleft palate speech using EPG.” doi
    12. (2002). Features of impaired tongue control in children with phonological disorder.” In
    13. (2002). Features of impaired tongue control in ildren with phonological disorder.” In
    14. (2002). Labial-lingual double articulations in cleft palate speech.” doi
    15. (2002). Labial-lingual double ticulations in cleft palate speech.” doi
    16. (2002). R us di Jo [13]
    17. (1983). The segmental organization of speech”. doi
    18. (1983). The segmental organization of speech”. In doi
    19. (1971). Theoretical issues in child onology.” Papers of the 7th Regional Meeting, hicago Linguistic Society,
    20. (1971). Theoretical issues in child phonology.”
    21. (1999). Undifferentiated lingual gestures in children with articulation/phonological disorders”. doi
    22. (2001). Visual feedback therapy ing electropalatography (EPG) for articulation sorders associated with cleft palate.” Asia Pacific urnal of Speech, doi
    23. (2001). Visual feedback therapy using electropalatography (EPG) for articulation disorders associated with cleft palate.” Asia Pacific doi
    24. (1999). Widening access to electropalatography for children with persistent sound system disorders.” doi
    25. (1999). Widening access to electropalatography for ildren with persistent sound system disorders.” merican doi

    To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.