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Low induction number, ground conductivity meters : a correction procedure in the absence of magnetic effects

By David Beamish

Abstract

Ground conductivity meters, comprising a variety of coil–coil configurations, are intended to operate within the limits provided by a low induction number (LIN), electromagnetic condition. They are now routinely used across a wide range of application areas and the measured apparent conductivity data may be spatially assembled and examined/correlated alongside information obtained from many other earth science, environmental, soil and land use assessments. The theoretical behaviour of the common systems is examined in relation to both the prevailing level of subsurface conductivity and the instrument elevation. It is demonstrated that, given the inherent high level of accuracy of modern instruments, the prevailing LIN condition may require operation in environments restricted to very low (< 12 mS/m) conductivities. Beyond this limit, non-linear departures from the apparent conductivity that would be associated with a LIN condition occur and are a function of the coil configuration, the instrument height and the prevailing conductivity. Using both theory and experimental data, it is demonstrated that this has the potential to provide biased and spatially distorted measurements. A simple correction procedure that can be applied to the measured data obtained from any of the LIN instruments is developed. The correction procedure would, in the limit of a uniform subsurface, return the same (correct) conductivity, irrespective of the ground conductivity meter used, the prevailing conductivity or the measurement height.\ud \u

Publisher: Elsevier
Year: 2011
DOI identifier: 10.1016/j.jappgeo.2011.07.005
OAI identifier: oai:nora.nerc.ac.uk:16079

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