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Transnational citizenship: multiplicity of rights, responsibilities and opportunities

By Marco Fedi

Abstract

Italy's citizenship laws are moving towards jus soli for migrants to Italy and to accommodate dual citizenship for people of Italian origin living abroad. MPs elected from abroad have made Italy governable and fuelled interest in transnational citizenship. This gives social, political and cultural dimensions to the concept of globalisation which has hitherto been dominated by economics. This is a positive change. The only threat to democracy comes not from transnational citizenship but from an excessive concern with the national interest.Includes an introduction by Katharine Betts written for the three articles:<br /><br /> Hugo, G.; Defining Australia's national population in the era of globalisation. People and Place. 2006; 14(4): 26-33<br /><br />Carli, C.; Italian citizenship and the transcending of territory. People and Place. 2006; 14(4): 34-36<br /><br />Fedi, M.; Transnational citizenship: multiplicity of rights, responsibilities and opportunities. People and Place. 2006; 14(4): 37-3

Topics: Citizenship laws, Migrants, Dual citizenship, Transnational citizenship
Publisher: Monash University Centre for Population and Urban Research
Year: 2006
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