Article thumbnail
Location of Repository

Short left coronary artery trunk as a risk factor in the development of coronary atherosclerosis. Pathological study.

By N Gazetopoulos, P J Ioannidis, C Karydis, C Lolas, K Kiriakou and C Tountas

Abstract

The relation between the length of the main left coronary artery and the degree of atherosclerosis in its branches was studied by postmortem examination in 204 subjects aged 20 to 90 years. The findings suggest that in cases with a short main left coronary artery the atherosclerotic lesions in the anterior descending and circumflex branches appear earlier, progress faster at higher levels of severity, and lead more frequently to myocardial infarction, than in cases with a long left coronary artery trunk. In cases over the age of 50 years, where disease is expected to have developed, it was shown that the degree of atherosclerosis in the left anterior descending and circumflex branches was inversely related to the length of the main left coronary artery. The correlation coefficients were -0-527 and -0-428, respectively, and in either case a test for zero correlations was significant (P less than 0-001). The possible changes in the haemodynamic and mechanical conditions associated with the variations of the anatomical pattern of the coronary arteries and their influence in the development of atherosclerosis are discussed. It is suggested that the length of the main left coronary artery is a congenital anatomical and possibly hereditary factor influencing the rate of development of atherosclerosis in the branches of the main left coronary artery

Topics: Research Article
Year: 1976
DOI identifier: 10.1136/hrt.38.11.1160
OAI identifier: oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:483149
Provided by: PubMed Central
Sorry, our data provider has not provided any external links therefore we are unable to provide a link to the full text.

Suggested articles


To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.