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Data from: Size-dependent mating pattern in a nuptial gift-giving insect

By Martina Dorkova, Ladislav Nado, Benjamin Jarcuska and Peter Kanuch

Abstract

The reproductive interests of females and males often diverge in terms of the number of mating partners, an individual’s phenotype, origin, genes and parental investment. This conflict may lead to a variety of sex-specific adaptations and also affect mate choice in both sexes. We conducted an experiment with the bush-cricket Pholidoptera griseoaptera (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae), a species in which females receive direct nutritional benefits during mating. Mated individuals could be assigned due to the genotype of male spermatodoses, which are stored in the female’s spermatheca. After three weeks of possible copulations in established mating groups which were random replications with four females and males we did not find consistent assortative mating preference regarding to body size of mates. However, our results showed that the frequency of within-pair copulations (192 analyzed mating events in 128 possible pair-wise combinations) was positively associated with the body size of both mated individuals with significant interaction between sexes (having one mate very large, association between body size and the number of copulations has weaken). Larger individuals also showed a higher degree of polygamy. This suggests that body size of this nuptial gift-giving insect species is an important sexual trait according to which both sexes choose their optimal mating partner

Topics: body size, genotypes, spermatodoses, mating frequency
Year: 2018
DOI identifier: 10.5061/dryad.k4r4927
OAI identifier: oai:v1.datadryad.org:10255/dryad.198266
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