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Role of Mast Cells in Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Neoplasia in IL-10-Deficient Mice

By Maciej Chichlowski, Greg S. Westwood, Soman N. Abraham and Laura P. Hale

Abstract

Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is hypothesized to result from stimulation of immune responses against resident intestinal bacteria within a genetically susceptible host. Mast cells may play a critical role in IBD pathogenesis, since they are typically located just beneath the intestinal mucosal barrier and can be activated by bacterial antigens. Methodology/Principal Findings: This study investigated effects of mast cells on inflammation and associated neoplasia in IBD-susceptible interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice with and without mast cells. IL-10-deficient mast cells produced more proinflammatory cytokines in vitro both constitutively and when triggered, compared with wild type mast cells. However despite this enhanced in vitro response, mast cell-sufficient Il10 2/2 mice actually had decreased cecal expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interferon (IFN)-c mRNA, suggesting that mast cells regulate inflammation in vivo. Mast cell deficiency predisposed Il10 2/2 mice to the development of spontaneous colitis and resulted in increased intestinal permeability in vivo that preceded the development of colon inflammation. However, mast cell deficiency did not affect the severity of IBD triggered by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAID) exposure or helicobacter infection that also affect intestinal permeability. Conclusions/Significance: Mast cells thus appear to have a primarily protective role within the colonic microenvironment by enhancing the efficacy of the mucosal barrier. In addition, although mast cells were previously implicated in progressio

Year: 2013
OAI identifier: oai:CiteSeerX.psu:10.1.1.352.568
Provided by: CiteSeerX
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