Location of Repository

ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME AND VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR RESPONSES TO EXERCISE TRAINING IN CLAUDICANTS: THE ROLE OF ACE INHIBITION

By Paul Ng

Abstract

Exercise training is well recognised as an effective treatment for intermittent claudication. The mechanism underlying exercise induced improvements is multifactorial but remains poorly understood. Low angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity has been associated with enhanced responses to endurance training. Specifically, low ACE activity has been associated with improved muscle metabolism, endothelial function, and suppressed inflammatory responses; processes linked with exercise training benefits in claudicants. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of ACE has been associated with enhanced angiogenesis in animal models of ischaemia, secondary to increases in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In this study, 11 claudicants were randomised to 8 weeks of supervised exercise training (n=6) or exercise advice (n=5). Walking ability was recorded before and after this period, and blood samples taken. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the effects of exercise training on ACE, VEGF and VEGF receptor (VEGFR) gene expression, and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays (ELISA

Year: 2009
OAI identifier: oai:CiteSeerX.psu:10.1.1.320.9429
Provided by: CiteSeerX
Download PDF:
Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s):
  • http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/v... (external link)
  • http://eprints.ucl.ac.uk/18570... (external link)
  • Suggested articles


    To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.