Skip to main content
Article thumbnail
Location of Repository

Thinking about developmental states in Africa

By Thandika Mkandawire

Abstract

During much of the 1980s and 90s, a literature emerged suggesting that ‘developmental states’ were impossible in Africa. The arguments given ranged from cultural ones about the pervasive nature of clientalism to structural ones on the dependence of African economies or the atypical levels of rent seeking in African economies. This paper argues that Africa has had states that were ‘developmental’ in both their aspirations and economic performance. It further argues that these experiences need to be examined critically for useful lessons, an exercise that has been hindered by an excessive levelling of the African political and economic landscapes

Topics: JF Political institutions (General)
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Year: 2001
DOI identifier: 10.1093/cje
OAI identifier: oai:eprints.lse.ac.uk:38967
Provided by: LSE Research Online
Download PDF:
Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s):
  • http://cje.oxfordjournals.org/ (external link)
  • http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/38967... (external link)
  • Suggested articles


    To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.