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Gammelfleisch everywhere? public debate, variety of worldviews and regulatory change

By Martin Lodge, Kai Wegrich and Gail McElroy

Abstract

Cultural theory has attracted considerable interest in the study of risk regulation. There has, however, been a lack of a systematic interest in its claims and in methodological issues. In this paper, we present seven claims that are either directly drawn from central claims of cultural theory or from complementary theories and assess them in the light of one single case, failure in meat inspections in Germany. These claims are assessed through the analysis of argumentation in newspapers

Topics: K Law (General)
Publisher: Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation, London School of Economics and Political Science
Year: 2008
OAI identifier: oai:eprints.lse.ac.uk:36532
Provided by: LSE Research Online

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