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USING MENTAL IMAGERY PROCESSES FOR TEACHING/SEARCHING IN MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

By Pierre Arnoux and Alain Finkel

Abstract

Abstract. The role of mental representations in mathematics and computer sciences (for teaching or searching) is often downplayed or even completely ignored. Using an ongoing work on the subject, we argue for a more systematic study and use of mental representations, to get an intuition of mathematical concepts, and also to understand and build proofs. We give several examples. 1. introduction 1.1. Background. The study of mental representations (specially visual ones, i.e. visual images) has a long history. Philosophers from Platon and Aristote to Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty have explored mental states. The beginning of the scientific exploration of mental states can be dated 150 years ago. The Wursbourg School (Tichener 1850), the introspective psychology (Binet 1900) described the phenomenology of mental states. Wittgenstein(1922) proposes a theory of semantics in which one builds images from facts and combines images. (See the web page about mental imagery

Year: 2012
OAI identifier: oai:CiteSeerX.psu:10.1.1.218.1363
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