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When should leaders share information with their subordinates?

By Jordi Blanes i Vidal and Marc Möller

Abstract

We show that when leaders share some of their information with subordinates, decision making is subject to a motivational bias; leaders make the decisions their subordinates want to see. As this bias increases with the quality of the shared information, an improvement of an organization's information might even decrease its efficiency. As a consequence, information sharing is not always optimal. We show however that self-confidence can help the leader to overcome his motivational bias, thus making information sharing more attractive. Conversely, we find that information sharing can help to curb the autocratic tendencies of a self-confident leadership. We conclude that a policy of information sharing and the appointment of a self-confident leadership are most effective when they go hand in hand

Topics: HD28 Management. Industrial Management
Publisher: Wiley
Year: 2007
DOI identifier: 10.1111/j.1530-9134.2007.00139.x
OAI identifier: oai:eprints.lse.ac.uk:31535
Provided by: LSE Research Online
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