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Evidence-based policy: what's to be done about relevance?

By Nancy Cartwright

Abstract

How can philosophy of science be of more practical use? One thing we can do is provide practicable advice about how to determine when one empirical claim is relevant to the truth of another; i.e., about evidential relevance. This matters especially for evidence-based policy, where advice is thin—and misleading—about how to tell what counts as evidence for policy effectiveness. This paper argues that good efficacy results (as in randomized controlled trials), which are all the rage now, are only a very small part of the story. To tell what facts are relevant for judging policy effectiveness, we need to construct causal scenarios about will happen when the policy is implemented

Topics: B Philosophy (General)
Publisher: Springer Netherlands
Year: 2009
DOI identifier: 10.1007/s11098-008-9311-4
OAI identifier: oai:eprints.lse.ac.uk:30214
Provided by: LSE Research Online
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