Skip to main content
Article thumbnail
Location of Repository

Private environmental governance and international relations: exploring the links

By Robert Falkner
Topics: JZ International relations
Publisher: The MIT Press
Year: 2003
DOI identifier: 10.1162/152638003322068227
OAI identifier: oai:eprints.lse.ac.uk:17689
Provided by: LSE Research Online

Suggested articles

Citations

  1. (2001). A Public Role for the Private Sector: Industry Self-Regulation in a Global Economy. Washington DC: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
  2. (1984). After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy. doi
  3. (1992). and Ernst-Otto Czempiel, doi
  4. (1997). Business and International Environmental Treaties: Ozone Depletion and Climate Change. doi
  5. (2001). Business ConÂșict and U.S. International Environmental Policy: Ozone, Climate, and Biodiversity.
  6. (1992). Changing Course: A Global Business Perspective on Development and the Environment. doi
  7. (2000). Contesting Global Governance: Multilateral Economic Institutions and Global Social Movements. Cambridge: doi
  8. (1995). Corporate Environmental Strategy: The Avalanche of Change since Bhopal. doi
  9. (1995). Crossing the Boundaries between Public and Private: International Regimes and Non-State Actors.
  10. (1996). Environmental Activism and World Civic Politics. doi
  11. (2001). Environmental NGOs, TNCs, and the Question of Governance. doi
  12. (1993). Environmental Strategies for Industry. Washington DC:
  13. (2000). Exporting Environmentalism: doi
  14. (1994). Financing the UNCED Agenda: The Controversy over Additionality. doi
  15. (1996). Forest Politics: The Evolution of International Cooperation.
  16. (2000). Global Business Regulation. Cambridge: doi
  17. (1996). Global Civil Society and Global Environmental Governance: The Politics of Nature from Place to Planet. doi
  18. (1990). Global Companies and Public Policy: The Growing Challenge of Foreign Direct Investment. doi
  19. (1997). Governance in Global Civil Society. In Global Governance: Drawing Insights from the Environmental Experience, edited by doi
  20. (1993). Gramsci, Historical Materialism and International Relations. Cambridge: doi
  21. (1995). Green and Competitive: Ending the Stalemate.
  22. (2001). Introduction: Problems and Solutions in the International Political Economy of the Environment.
  23. (2001). Misguided Virtue: False Notions of Corporate Social Responsibility. Hobart Paper No. 142. London: Institute of Economic Affairs.
  24. (1999). No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies. doi
  25. (1987). Production, Power, and World Order: Social Forces in the Making of History. doi
  26. (1987). Rational Ecology: Environment and Political Economy. doi
  27. (2000). Regulating Biotech Trade: The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety. doi
  28. (2001). The Compromise of Liberal Environmentalism. doi
  29. (1994). The Earth Brokers. Power, Politics and World Development. doi
  30. (1997). The Eclipse of the State? ReÂșections on Stateness in an Era of Globalization. doi
  31. (1995). The End of the Nation State. The Rise of Regional Economics. doi
  32. (1992). The New Politics of Pollution. Manchester: doi
  33. (1995). The New World Order, Incorporated:
  34. (1998). The Privatization of Global Environmental Governance: doi
  35. (1996). The Retreat of the State: The Diffusion of Power in the World Economy. Cambridge: doi
  36. (2001). The Silent Takeover: Global Capitalism and the Death of Democracy.
  37. (1990). Turbulence in World Politics: A Theory of Change and Continuity. doi
  38. (1994). Using Sustainable Development: The Business Case. doi
  39. (1993). Whose Common Future? Reclaiming the Commons. doi

To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.