Location of Repository

Self-reported Work Ability and Work Performance in Workers with Chronic Nonspecific Musculoskeletal Pain

By H.J. de Vries, M.F. Reneman, J.W. Groothoff, J.H. Geertzen and S. Brouwer

Abstract

<p>Purpose To assess self-reported work ability and work performance of workers who stay at work despite chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain (CMP), and to explore which variables were associated with these outcomes. Methods In a cross-sectional study we assessed work ability (Work Ability Index, single item scale 0-10) and work performance (Health and Work Performance Questionnaire, scale 0-10) among 119 workers who continued work while having CMP. Scores of work ability and work performance were categorized into excellent (10), good (9), moderate (8) and poor (0-7). Hierarchical multiple regression and logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the relation of socio-demographic, pain-related, personal- and work-related variables with work ability and work performance. Results Mean work ability and work performance were 7.1 and 7.7 (poor to moderate). Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that higher work ability scores were associated with lower age, better general health perception, and higher pain self-efficacy beliefs (R-2 = 42 %). Higher work performance was associated with lower age, higher pain self-efficacy beliefs, lower physical work demand category and part-time work (R-2 = 37 %). Logistic regression analysis revealed that work ability a parts per thousand yen8 was significantly explained by age (OR = 0.90), general health perception (OR = 1.04) and pain self-efficacy (OR = 1.15). Work performance a parts per thousand yen8 was explained by pain self-efficacy (OR = 1.11). Conclusions Many workers with CMP who stay at work report poor to moderate work ability and work performance. Our findings suggest that a subgroup of workers with CMP can stay at work with high work ability and performance, especially when they have high beliefs of pain self-efficacy. Our results further show that not the pain itself, but personal and work-related factors relate to work ability and work performance.</p>

Topics: Work ability, Work performance; Chronic pain; Musculoskeletal disorders; Staying at work; LOW-BACK-PAIN; HEALTH-ORGANIZATION HEALTH; TERM SICKNESS ABSENCE; PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES; QUESTIONNAIRE HPQ; PRODUCTIVITY LOSS; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY; DISABILITY INDEX; UNITED-STATES
Year: 2013
DOI identifier: 10.1007/s10926-012-9373-1
OAI identifier: oai:pure.rug.nl:publications/8aec804f-7f97-4917-bc46-24cc71cedb5e
Download PDF:
Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s):
  • http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s109... (external link)
  • Suggested articles


    To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.