Skip to main content
Article thumbnail
Location of Repository

Online recreation: The relationship between loneliness, Internet self-efficacy and the use of the Internet for entertainment purposes

By Monica T. Whitty and Deborah McLaughlin

Abstract

In this study, 150 undergraduates answered questions about their Internet usage and completed a loneliness and an Internet self-efficacy questionnaire. A factor analysis of the Internet usage items revealed three facets of online recreation, including, using the Internet for: computer-based entertainment, to facilitate offline entertainment, and for information about the entertainment world. Those who scored higher on loneliness were more likely to use the Internet for computer-based entertainment, as well as, use the Internet to obtain information about the entertainment world. Individuals higher in Internet self-efficacy were more likely to use the Internet for computer-based entertainment and to facilitate offline entertainment. Implications for the study of the psychological influences of the Internet are discussed in this paper.Peer-reviewedPost-prin

Topics: online recreation, Internet, leisure, entertainment, loneliness, self-efficacy, TECHNOLOGY, PARADOX
Publisher: Elsevier
Year: 2005
DOI identifier: 10.1016/j.chb.2005.05.003
OAI identifier: oai:lra.le.ac.uk:2381/10020
Journal:

Suggested articles

Citations

  1. (2003). America’s online pursuits: The changing picture of who’s online and what they do.
  2. (1995). Computer self-efficacy: Development of a measure and initial test. doi
  3. (2003). Cyberspace as potential space: Considering the web as a playground to cyber-flirt. doi
  4. (2003). Impact of high-speed Internet on user behaviours: case study doi
  5. (2002). In defence of the Internet: The relationship between Internet communication and depression, loneliness, self-esteem, and perceived social support. doi
  6. (2002). Internet paradox revisited. doi
  7. (2000). Internet self-efficacy and the psychology of the digital divide. doi
  8. (2003). Loneliness and social uses of the Internet. doi
  9. (2004). Modelling a system to deliver electronic entertainment over a Broadband connection. doi
  10. (2004). Online computer gaming: A comparison of adolescent and adult gamers. doi
  11. (2003). Online Gaming Doubles in Europe in One Year.
  12. Online recreation Internet paradox: A social technology that reduces social involvement and psychological well-being? doi
  13. (2001). Reformulating the Internet paradox: Social cognitive explanations of Internet use and depression.
  14. (1998). Response to the HomeNet study,
  15. (1999). Self-efficacy and the search for government information.
  16. (1999). Self-efficacy: Toward a unifying theory of behavioral change. In doi
  17. (1999). Social Cognitive Theory and individual reactions to computing technology: A longitudinal study. doi
  18. (1999). The relationship between loneliness and Internet use and abuse. doi
  19. (1996). The UCLA Loneliness Scale (Version 3): Reliability, validity, and factor structure. doi
  20. (1996). Using multivariate statistics (3rd Edition).

To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.