Location of Repository

Rival Jerusalems : the geography of Victorian religion

By Keith D.M. Snell and Paul S. Ell

Abstract

This book is available from Cambridge University Press at http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521771559Metadata only entryContents: Introduction; Part I. Religious Geographies: The Districts of England and Wales: 1. The 1851 Census of Religious Worship; 2. The Church of England; 3. Old dissent: the Presbyterians, Independents, Baptists, Quakers and Unitarians; 4. The geographies of new dissent; 5. Roman Catholicism and Irish immigration; 6. Denominational co-existence, reciprocity or exclusion?; Part II. Religion and Locality: Parish-Level Explorations: 7. The prospect of fifteen counties; 8. From Henry Compton to Maurice Mann: stability or relocation in Catholicism and Nonconformity, and the growth of religious pluralism; 9. The Sunday school movement: child labour, denominational control and working-class culture; 10. Free or appropriated sittings: the Anglican church in perspective; 11. Conformity, dissent and the influence of landownership; 12. Urbanisation and regional secularisation; Technical Appendices: A. Denominational statistics; B. Correction of registration-district data; C. The religious measures; D. Computer cartographic methods; E. Landownership and the Imperial Gazetteer; F. The 1861 Census of Religious Worship?; Bibliography.Summary \ud This pioneering book is based upon very extensive analysis of the famous 1851 Census of Religious Worship and earlier sources such as the 1676 Compton Census. The authors stress contextual and regional understanding of religion. Among the subjects covered for all of England and Wales are the geography of the Church of England, Roman Catholicism, the old and new dissenting denominations, the spatial complementarity of denominations, and their importance for political history. A range of further questions are then analysed, such as regional continuities in religion, the growth of religious pluralism, Sunday schools and child labour during industrialisation, free and appropriated church sittings, landownership and religion, and urbanisation and regional 'secularisation'. This book's advanced methods and findings will have far-reaching influence within the disciplines of history, historical and cultural geography, religious sociology and in the social science community general

Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Year: 2000
DOI identifier: 10.2277/0521771552
OAI identifier: oai:lra.le.ac.uk:2381/8261
Download PDF:
Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s):
  • http://hdl.handle.net/2381/826... (external link)
  • http://www.cambridge.org/uk/ca... (external link)
  • http://www.cambridge.org/uk/ca... (external link)
  • Suggested articles


    To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.