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The Verreville pottery Glasgow: Ceramic Resource Disk 4

By George Haggarty

Abstract

The ceramic material listed, described, and photographed, on the enclosed ceramic resource disk, comes from an archaeological excavation funded by FM Developments Ltd., and carried out in 2005 on the site of the Verreville glass and pottery manufactury in Glasgow by Headland Archaeology Ltd. The ceramic material recovered dates mostly from the Kidston and Cochran periods (see below), and has been sorted by fabric type, decoration, and form, into (18 Folders and 152 Word Files). The excavation material has been assigned to Glasgow Museums and the shards were catalogued using there accession numbers beginning (GM 2006. 05. 1 to 1194). The ceramic assemblage is significant in that it was produced mainly for the North American export market, and therefore many of its products are extremely rare in Britain. The transfer printed patterns illustrated on (Word Files 102 to 129) have been given temporary names by the author, who would be happy to be contacted by ceramic researchers who could fill in the detail

Topics: DA Great Britain, NK Decorative arts Applied arts Decoration and ornament
Publisher: National Museums Scotland
Year: 2006
OAI identifier: oai:repository.nms.ac.uk:304

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Citations

  1. (1983). 1984a ‘The Verreville Potter y:
  2. (1983). 1984a ‘The Verreville Pottery:
  3. 1984b ‘Note: 1798 – Delftfield making creamware’
  4. 2006a The West Pans, East Loth ian,
  5. 2006a The West Pans, East Lothian, Scotland: Ceramic Resource Disk’
  6. (2006). 2006b ‘A gazetteer and summary of recorded French pottery imported into Scotland c 1150 to c 1650: a ceramic contribution to Scotland’s economic history’ Tayside and Fife Archaeological Journal,
  7. (2006). 5. 1031) The two 45mm legs have red clay around the bases.
  8. (2006). 5. 1076) C. Vessel Type Shards Height Rim & Base Diam Impressed Marks Illus No 393 Bowls. 1 B. 2 72mm 125mm + 68mm 393 Bowls. 1 B. 1 76mm 150mm + 70mm 393 Bowls. 1 B. 1 + 82mm Flower (No 1) 393 Bowls.
  9. (2006). 5. 1100) (Three shards from three London shaped cups) C. Cups Saucers Heights Rim Dia + Base Dia Impressed Marks Illus No 685 B. 3 58mm 88mm + 42mm (GM:
  10. (2006). 5. 1103) (Three shards from a London shaped cup) C. Cups Saucers Heights Rim Dia + Base Dia Impressed Marks Illus No 846 B. + 47mm (GM:
  11. (1996). A doi
  12. (2003). A number of Verreville shards bearing the Princess Royal mark, see (illus 608 & 609) on pages 2 & 3, have already been publishe d, and include illustrations by
  13. (2003). A number of Verreville shards bearing the Princess Royal mark, see (illus 608 & 609) on pages 2 & 3, have already been published, and include illustrations by
  14. (1985). An Anthology of British Teapots.
  15. (2006). At present I have no real idea what these distinct redware vessels were used for. (GM:
  16. (1998). Bits and Bobs - The development of Kiln Furniture in the 18thcentury Staffordshire pottery industry’,
  17. (2006). context 472 See page 5 (GM:
  18. (2006). Diameter Leg Heights Round Legs Flattish Legs Total
  19. (1996). E 1993a ‘The Life of Robert
  20. E 1993b Scottish Sponge Printed Pottery.
  21. (1993). E 1993c ‘The Kidston Connection:
  22. (1993). E 1993c ‘The Kidston Connection: Some Additional Notes’ Scottish Pottery 15 th Historical Revue
  23. (1994). Eng lish shell-edged earthenware’ Antiques,
  24. (1994). English shell-edged earthenware’ Antiques,
  25. (2006). Four shards: Three base and one body from two creamware bowls: GM:
  26. (1991). Gifts For Good Children-The History of Children’s China 190-1890.
  27. (2006). Hundreds of plaster of Paris fragments littered the site (mainly from pie dishes in a backfilled workroom). Only fragments and examples which the author thought could add to our knowledge of the wares produced were retained. Boxes: 31, 32: (GM:
  28. (1999). illustrates part of a Verreville bone china tea service from the Kidston period with two different diagnostic lilac sprigs
  29. (1987). J.A. doi
  30. (2005). Newbigging Pottery Musselburgh: Ceramic Resource Disk’
  31. (2006). One female half of a plaster of Paris mould: a knop. 8 GM:
  32. (2006). One fragment from a plaster of Paris, handle mould: 6 GM:
  33. (2006). One fragment from a plaster of Paris, handle mould: GM:
  34. (2006). One fragment of a Paris mould with small details: GM:
  35. (2006). One fragment of a plaster of Paris mould: a small plate. GM:
  36. (2006). One half of a plaster of Paris mould: A handle for an open vessel: small tureen? 7 GM:
  37. (2006). One half of a plaster of Paris mould: I have no idea what this is but it looks like a crown? 9 GM:
  38. (2006). One moulded rim shard from a plate. The glazed has a creamware look to it. (GM:
  39. (2006). Painted in Blue: Underg laze Blue-Painted Earthenware 1775 to 1810.
  40. (2006). Painted in Blue: Underglaze Blue-Painted Earthenware 1775 to 1810.
  41. (2006). Rarely found from the excavations were what I have termed ‘high triangular stilts’. One of these industrially made stilts has ‘ B & Co’ moulded on one edge, while two have what looks like ‘ B & G’ or ‘B &’ with an upside down ‘5’ see (illus 804) left. GM:
  42. (2006). Rarely found from the excavations were what I have termed ‘high triangular stilts’. One of these industrially made stilts has ‘B & Co’ moulded on one edge, while two have what looks like ‘B & G’ or ‘B &’ with an upside down ‘5’ see (illus 804) left. GM:
  43. (1999). Scottish Ceramics.
  44. (1923). Scottish Pottery.
  45. (2006). Several of the Verreville, industrially moulded, three-armed, stilts in various sizes have round centres. One of these has the manufacture initials, either
  46. (2006). shaped rods or, usually, fragments of these, were very common from all phases of the site, and not all were collected, see (illus 803) above, for two examples with glazed ends. (GM:
  47. (2006). Site context or feature number in the left hand boxes.
  48. (1985). teapots are generally dated to c1820 (Miller & Berthoud
  49. (1987). The Erroneous Wares Attributions in
  50. (1993). The Kidston Connection with Anderston Pottery and with the Verreville Pottery at Finnieston’ Scottish Pottery 15 th Historical Revue
  51. (2006). The samples are typical English flint: (GM:
  52. (2006). There is also one handle shard. All are from a round teapot decorated with a band of foliage between two rouletted bands of beading, and over a broad band of fine rouletting. (GM:
  53. (2006). Type a handle which was used on bone china cups with A & B sprigs. 2 (GM:
  54. (2001). Verreville Glassworks and Pottery-Finnieston,
  55. (2006). Vessel Type Shards Height Rim & Base Diam Impressed Marks Illus No 1168
  56. (1904). William Adams, an old English Potter.
  57. (1904). William Adams, an old English Potter. London. 1 Bone China: Sprigged:

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