Skip to main content
Article thumbnail
Location of Repository

ANALYSIS OF PLANT MACROFOSSIL REMAINS IN THEIR STRATIGRAPHIC SEQUENCE FROM \ud 42-48 SCOTCH STREET, CARLISLE:\ud \ud WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE MEDIAEVAL PERIOD WITH A BRIEF EVALUATION OF THE MATERIAL\ud IN RELATION TO OTHER \ud MEDIAEVAL REMAINS FROM CARLISLE

By PATRICIA SHAW

Abstract

In 2003 The North Pennines Heritage Trust, now North Pennines Archaeology Limited undertook a programme of archaeological works at 42-48 Scotch Street, Carlisle, in advance of building redevelopment. Multiple phases of archaeological activity were identified and recorded, possibly dating from the prehistoric period to the present day. The area exhibited continuity of use throughout the Roman Period, becoming a backwater of Carlisle in the late Hadrianic/early Antonine period. After the late Roman Period archaeology was found dating through from the late fourth to the twelfth century. \ud \ud The following Mediaeval sequence begins in the early twelfth century with numerous rubbish pits over the site. The most significant Mediaeval activity present was defined by a series of fourteenth century pottery kilns that had gone out of use by the late fourteenth century when the site was covered with other rubbish pits. The late Mediaeval and Early Modern Period in the area witnessed very little activity; the next phase of activity corresponding to the late eighteenth to early nineteenth century redevelopment of Scotch Street; these buildings for the most remaining extant to the present day, most having modern modifications. \ud \ud Analysis of plant macrofossils concentrated on the site at 42-48 Scotch Street, Carlisle and information retrieved from it for the Mediaeval Period. Preserved botanical remains from contexts dating to the Mediaeval Period of the site were used to determine whether there was a correlation between them and the ethnohistorical evidence available for the period. Preliminary assessment conducted previously had led to this study; more in depth analysis leading to these results. The Mediaeval phase for the site was examined using ethno historical sources in conjunction with the botanical material. \ud \ud The results proved the botanical material retrieved reflected the social and economic changes for the period studied. The study concludes with a discussion of the practices leading to the recovery of the botanical material and the relevance of the ethnohistorical data to the interpretations produced

Topics: Mediaeval, Archaeology, Carlisle, Plant macrofossils, Archaeobotany
Year: 2010
OAI identifier: oai:etheses.dur.ac.uk:3278
Provided by: Durham e-Theses

Suggested articles


To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.