Article thumbnail
Location of Repository

Kuhn on discovery and the case of Penicillin

By D. Gillies

Abstract

Book description: Nowadays, philosophy and methodology of science appear as a combination of novelty and continuity. This blend is clear both in the general approaches to science (those thought of as any science) and in the specific perspectives on every science, either formal or empirical. There are new topics for philosophical reflection, such as key issues in philosophy of medicine and central problems raised by neuroscience. Thus, new contents have brought attention to aspects that previously went almost unnoticed. In addition, there are new angles for philosophical study, such as the repercussion of society on scientific activity (in aims, processes, and results). But the background of the main philosophical and methodological trends of the twentieth century is, in many ways, still in place. Wenceslao J. Gonzalez is Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science. He has been a visiting researcher at the Universities of St. Andrews, Münster and London (LSE), as well as Visiting fellow at the Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh. He has given lectures at the Universities of Pittsburgh, Stanford, Quebec and Helsinki. The conferences in which he has participated include those organized by the Universities of Uppsala, New South Wales, Bologna, and Canterbury (New Zealand). He has edited 21 volumes, among them are Philosophy and Methodology of Economics (1998) and Science, Technology and Society: A Philosophical Perspective (2005). Jesus Alcolea is Reader [Titular Professor] of Logic and Philosophy of Science. He undertook research at Smith College (Northampton, MA) with Th. Tymoczko. His focus of research has been on philosophy of mathematics: “Proof as a Way to Increase Understanding” (1996), “Fallibilism and Realism in Lakatos” (1999), “Vigencia del Pensamiento filosófico-matemático de Imre Lakatos” (2001), and “La extensión de los conceptos matemáticos” (2005)

Publisher: Netbiblo
Year: 2006
OAI identifier: oai:eprints.ucl.ac.uk.OAI2:16512
Provided by: UCL Discovery

Suggested articles

Citations

  1. (1935). Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact,
  2. (1929). On the Antibacterial Action of Cultures of a Penicillium, with Special Reference to their Use in
  3. (1993). Philosophy of Science in the Twentieth Century. Four Central Themes,
  4. (1970). The Birth of Penicillin and the Disarming of Microbes, George Allen and Unwin,
  5. (1962). The Historical Structure of Scientific Discovery,
  6. (1979). The Making of a Great Scientist,
  7. (1984). The Man and the Myth, Chatto
  8. (1962). The Structure of Scientific Revolutions,

To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.