10.1021/nn303347k.s001

Wide Dynamic Range Sensing with Single Quantum Dot Biosensors

Abstract

Single-particle analysis of biosensors that use charge transfer as the means for analyte-dependent signaling with semiconductor nanoparticles, or quantum dots, was examined. Single-particle analysis of biosensors that use energy transfer show analyte-dependent switching of nanoparticle emission from off to on. The charge-transfer-based biosensors reported here show constant emission, where the analyte (maltose) increases the emission intensity. By monitoring the same nanoparticles under various conditions, a single charge-transfer-based biosensor construct (one maltose binding protein, one protein attachment position for the reductant, one type of nanoparticle) showed a dynamic range for analyte (maltose) detection spanning from 100 pM to 10 μM while the emission intensities increase from 25 to 175% at the single-particle level. Since these biosensors were immobilized, the correlation between the detected maltose concentration and the maltose-dependent emission intensity increase could be examined. Minimal correlation between maltose detection limits and emission increases was observed, suggesting a variety of reductant-nanoparticle surface interactions that control maltose-dependent emission intensity responses. Despite the heterogeneous responses, monitoring biosensor emission intensity over 5 min provided a quantifiable method to monitor maltose concentration. Immobilizing and tracking these biosensors with heterogeneous responses, however, expanded the analyte-dependent emission intensity and the analyte dynamic range obtained from a single construct. Given the wide dynamic range and constant emission of charge-transfer-based biosensors, applying these single molecule techniques could provide ultrasensitive, real-time detection of small molecules in living cells

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oai:figshare.com:article/2484022Last time updated on 2/12/2018

This paper was published in FigShare.

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