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The Influence of Specimen Misalignment on Wear in Conforming Pin on Disk Tests

By I. Garcia-Prieto, M. D. Faulkner and Jeffrey R. Alcock

Abstract

A pin-on-disk test apparatus was modified to decrease the degree of misalignment between the pin end and the disk counterface. This was achieved by separate alignment of both pin and disk. Disk alignment was allowed by incorporating a kinematic three-ball arrangement into the disk under-face. A self-aligning pin alignment system was introduced which did not require the perpendicularity of the pin to be measured. The unmodified system had an alignment within that permitted by the ASTM G99-95a standard. However, the modified, and improved, alignment system produced significant changes in recorded wear behaviour in comparison with the unmodified system. The standard deviation of the wear data was considerably reduced and the correlation of the wear data with applied load significantly improved. The modified alignment also reduced the absolute value of wear recorded. This effect was observed for both wear volume assessed from mass change and wear volume assessed from pin height change. The reduced constraint of a misaligned pin in comparison with that of a well-aligned pin may account for the difference in these results

Topics: Pin-on-disk, Reproducibility, Alignment, Wear volume
Publisher: Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam.
Year: 2004
DOI identifier: 10.1016/j.wear.2003.10.015
OAI identifier: oai:dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk:1826/827
Provided by: Cranfield CERES
Journal:

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Citations

  1. 1 ASTM standard designation G 99-95a (reapproved 2000), Standard test method for wear testing with a pin-on-disk apparatus, Metals test methods and analytical procedures
  2. 10-point averaged wear data for the modified pin-on-disk configuration.
  3. 10-point averaged wear data for the unmodified pin-on-disk configuration.
  4. a) Simplified sketch of disk rotating with perfect perpendicularity to the pin axis. b) simplified sketch of disk ‘run out’ as tilted disk rotates about its axis.
  5. An example of a ‘snap shot’ of the variation of LVDT signal with two rotations of the disk. Time base: 200 data points per second.
  6. Average arithmetic mean deviation of the raw wear signal between 100 and 200 s Test time for the modified configuration.
  7. Average arithmetic mean deviation of the raw wear signal between 100 and 200 s test time for the unmodified configuration.
  8. Average single rotation wear at the start of the wear test for the modified configuration.
  9. Average single rotation wear at the start of the wear test for the unmodified configuration.
  10. Average volume loss, calculated from pin height change, as a fraction of average volume loss calculated from mass loss, for the modified configuration.
  11. Average volume loss, calculated from pin height change, as a fraction of average volume loss calculated from mass loss, for the unmodified configuration.
  12. Average wear signal ‘amplitudes’ and their standard deviation at the start and end of the wear test for the modified configuration (a) start (b) end.
  13. Average wear signal ‘amplitudes’ and their standard deviation at the start and end of the wear test for the unmodified configuration (a) start (b) end.
  14. Average wear volume loss calculated from (a) pin height change (b) mass loss, for the unmodified configuration.
  15. Average wear volume loss calculated from (a) pin height change, (b) mass loss, for the modified configuration.
  16. Initial pin-on-disk configuration.
  17. Sketch of the carriage and pin holder modifications.
  18. Sketch of the kinematic disk design.
  19. (2002). Sliding wear behaviour of SiC whisker-reinforced aluminium composite, Wear doi
  20. Wear volume from mass and height measurements for the unmodified and modified configurations.

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