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Reducing the cost of preventive maintenance (PM) through adopting a proactive reliability-focused culture.

By Mark C. Eti, S. O. T. Ogaji and S. D. Probert

Abstract

The economic and political realities of the 1990s forced managers to reverse long-standing organizational cultures in order to reduce costs and energy expenditures in their organisations. For instance, these can be achieved, with respect to maintenance, by replacing a reactive repair-focused attitude by a proactive reliability-focused culture. Thereby far less (i) human effort is expended and (ii) energy would be wasted, both of which lead to increased profitability

Topics: Cost reduction, PM, Culture, Best practice, Nigerian industries
Publisher: Elsevier
Year: 2006
DOI identifier: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2006.01.002
OAI identifier: oai:dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk:1826/1193
Provided by: Cranfield CERES

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