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Automatic design and optimisation of thermoformed thin-walled structures.

By Hassan Ugail and M.J. Wilson

Abstract

YesHere the design and functional optimisation of thermoformed thin-walled structures\ud made from plastics is considered. Such objects are created in great numbers especially\ud in the food packaging industry. In fact these objects are produced in such vast numbers\ud each year, that one important task in the design of these objects is the minimisation of\ud the amount of plastic used, subject to functional constraints. In this paper a procedure for\ud achieving this is described, which involves the automatic optimisation of the mold shape\ud taking into account the strength of the final object and its thickness distribution, thus\ud reducing the need to perform inefficient and expensive `trial and error¿ experimentation\ud using physical prototypes.\ud An efficient technique for parameterising geometry is utilised here, enabling to create a\ud wide variety of possible mold shapes on which appropriate analysis can be performed. The\ud results of the analysis are used within an automatic optimisation routine enabling to find\ud a design which satisfies user requirements. Thus, the paper describes a rational means for\ud the automatic optimal design of composite thermoformed thin-walled structures

Topics: Design optimisation, Thermoformed thin-walled structures, Plastics, Minimization of materials, Parameterising geometry, Mold shapes
Publisher: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.
Year: 2004
OAI identifier: oai:bradscholars.brad.ac.uk:10454/2954
Provided by: Bradford Scholars
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