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KIKI - A Key to the Integration of Knowledge and Innovation

By Abigail Cauchi, Jennifer Fenech, Karl Fenech and Luana Micallef

Abstract

The proliferation of ICT within the educational domain is serving to overcome several barriers associated with traditional pedago- gies. However, the challenge of balancing educational objectives against technical limitations and harsh financial realities is becoming more rel- evant than ever. Specifically, one is often faced with insufficient funds for hardware resources, lack of streamlined distribution mechanisms for software, and irreconcilable disparities in the packages offered. In this paper, we present KIKI as a tentative solution to the aforemen- tioned obstacles. KIKI is a prototypical system devised following ex- tensive research on learning paradigms, including collaboration and the use of games within the educational context. It is meant to serve as a platform for deploying educational software through an extensible ar- chitecture which provides inherent support for MultiPoint functionality, inter-computer communication, user identification, and progress track- ing. Seamlessly integrated, it would bind all stakeholders (developers, administration, teachers, and students) in their respective roles, ampli- fying the dissemination of knowledge and providing enhanced educa- tional opportunities for all, irrespective of age and financial conditions. The system would also enable an innovative edge, giving unbounded op- portunities for the development of applications to best meet the local demands

Topics: QA76
Year: 2007
OAI identifier: oai:kar.kent.ac.uk:24079

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Citations

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