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REASON, PRACTICE, AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY IN THE CRITICAL PHILOSOPHY OF IMMANUEL KANT. (VOLUMES I AND II)

By JAMES ALBAN PUETZ

Abstract

This work examines the forces which led Immanuel Kant to develop a moral-teleological view of human history. It also develops the argument that the teleological view of human history is the principal ideological tool used in modern history to justify the control of human action. Kant develops a moral-teleology of history in response to (1) his own dismantling of rationalist metaphysics, and (2) the idea that politics and human action are struggles for survival and material benefit. Two ideal-types of political philosophies are developed. One is based on the dogmatic view of Kant\u27s philosophy of history. The other is based on the sceptical view of Hobbes that politics is the struggle to survive. It is argued that these two ideal-types define the parameters of modern political philosophy. It is shown that both of these types of political philosophy are based on the idea that the human will is adequate to all of the desires of human beings. This view is criticized but not transcended

Topics: Political science
Publisher: 'Purdue University (bepress)'
Year: 1980
OAI identifier: oai:docs.lib.purdue.edu:dissertations-19645
Provided by: Purdue E-Pubs
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