Location of Repository

Are non-responders in a quitline evaluation more likely to be smokers?

By Gilljam Hans, Björnström Catrine, Tomson Tanja and Helgason Asgeir

Abstract

<p>Abstract</p> <p>Background</p> <p>In evaluation of smoking cessation programs including surveys and clinical trials the tradition has been to treat non-responders as smokers. The aim of this paper is to assess smoking behaviour of non-responders in an evaluation of the Swedish national tobacco cessation quitline a nation-wide, free of charge service.</p> <p>Methods</p> <p>A telephone interview survey with a sample of people not participating in the original follow-up. The study population comprised callers to the Swedish quitline who had consented to participate in a 12 month follow-up but had failed to respond. A sample of 84 (18% of all non-responders) was included. The main outcome measures were self-reported smoking behaviour at the time of the interview and at the time of the routine follow-up. Also, reasons for not responding to the original follow-up questionnaire were assessed. For statistical comparison between groups we used Fischer's exact test, odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) on proportions and OR.</p> <p>Results</p> <p>Thirty-nine percent reported to have been smoke-free at the time they received the original questionnaire compared with 31% of responders in the original study population. The two most common reasons stated for not having returned the original questionnaire was claiming that they had returned it (35%) and that they had not received the questionnaire (20%). Non-responders were somewhat younger and were to a higher degree smoke-free when they first called the quitline.</p> <p>Conclusion</p> <p>Treating non-responders as smokers in smoking cessation research may underestimate the true effect of cessation treatment.</p

Topics: Public aspects of medicine, RA1-1270, Medicine, R, DOAJ:Public Health, DOAJ:Health Sciences
Publisher: BioMed Central
Year: 2005
DOI identifier: 10.1186/1471-2458-5-52
OAI identifier: oai:doaj.org/article:02d3233075404905a111faa965f042ca
Journal:
Download PDF:
Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s):
  • https://doaj.org/toc/1471-2458 (external link)
  • http://www.biomedcentral.com/1... (external link)
  • https://doaj.org/article/02d32... (external link)
  • Suggested articles


    To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.