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Nutritional status in Parkinson's disease patients undergoing deep-brain stimulation surgery : a pilot study

By Jamie M. Sheard, Susan Ash, Peter A. Silburn and Graham K. Kerr

Abstract

People with Parkinson’s disease (PD) are at higher risk of malnutrition due to PD symptoms and pharmacotherapy side effects. Poorer outcomes are associated with higher amounts of weight loss (>5%) and lower levels of fat free mass. When pharmacotherapy is no longer effective for symptom control, deep-brain stimulation (DBS) surgery may be considered. People with PD scheduled for DBS surgery were recruited from a Brisbane neurological clinic (n=11 out of 16). The Scale for Outcomes of Parkinson’s disease –Autonomic (SCOPA-AUT), Modified Constipation Assessment Scale (MCAS), and a 3-day food diary were mailed to participants’ homes for completion prior to hospital admission. During admission, the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA), weight, height and body composition were assessed. Mean(±s.d.) PD duration from diagnosis and time since occurrence of PD symptoms was 9.0(±8.0) and 12(±8.8) years, respectively. Five participants reported unintentional weight loss (average loss of 15.6%). PD duration but not years since symptom onset significantly predicted PG-SGA scores (β=4.2, t(8)=2.7, p<.05). Both were positively correlated with PG-SGA score (r = .667, r=.587). On average, participants classified as well-nourished (SGA-A) (n=4) were younger, had shorter disease durations, lower PG-SGA scores, higher body mass (BMI) and fat free mass (FFMI) indices when compared to malnourished participants (SGA-B) (n=7). They also reported fewer non-motor symptoms on the SCOPA-AUT and MCAS. Three participants had previously received dietetic advice but not in relation to PD. These findings demonstrate that malnutrition remains unrecognised and untreated in this group despite unintentional weight loss and a high prevalence of malnutrition

Topics: 110904 Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases, 111100 NUTRITION AND DIETETICS, 111101 Clinical and Sports Nutrition
Publisher: Wiley & Blackwell Publishing
Year: 2011
DOI identifier: 10.1261/j.1747-0080.2011.01504.x
OAI identifier: oai:eprints.qut.edu.au:55441
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