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Pornography and erotica: Definitions and prevalence

By N. Pope, K. Voges, Kerri-Ann Kuhn and E. Bloxsome

Abstract

In this paper, we offer some observations regarding the sex industry, in particular the pornography and erotica sectors. Marketing literature observing pornography and erotica is scant. We find that following exponential growth of the sex industry (given use of the Internet) an evaluation of consumer behaviour and marketing practices is justified. In order to begin a study of these industry sectors, we find it necessary to define both pornography and\ud erotica. Following the development of definitions, we consider these industries from a marketing perspective in the hope that we may encourage research into these areas

Topics: 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified, Pornography and Erotica:, Definitions, Prevalence, sex industry,, consumer behaviour, marketing practices
Publisher: Griffith University
Year: 2007
OAI identifier: oai:eprints.qut.edu.au:27717

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