Associations of key diet-quality indexes with mortality in the Multiethnic Cohort: the Dietary Patterns Methods Project1–5

Abstract

Background: Healthy dietary patterns have been linked positively with health and longevity. However, prospective studies in diverse populations in the United States addressing dietary patterns and mortality are limited. Objective: We assessed the ability of the following 4 diet-quality indexes [the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010), the Alternative HEI-2010 (AHEI-2010), the alternate Mediterranean diet score (aMED), and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)] to predict the reduction in risk of mortality from all causes, cardio-vascular disease (CVD), and cancer. Design: White, African American, Native Hawaiian, Japanese American, and Latino adults (n = 215,782) from the Multiethnic Cohort completed a quantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Scores for each dietary index were computed and divided into quin-tiles for men and women. Mortality was documented over 13–18 y of follow-up. HRs and 95 % CIs were computed by using adjusted Cox models. Results: High HEI-2010, AHEI-2010, aMED, and DASH scores were all inversely associated with risk of mortality from all causes, CVD, and cancer in both men and women (P-trend, 0.0001 for all models). For men, the HEI-2010 was consistently associated with a reduction in risk of mortality for all causes (HR: 0.75; 95 % CI: 0.71, 0.79), CVD (HR: 0.74; 95 % CI: 0.69, 0.81), and cancer (HR: 0.76; 95 % CI: 0.70, 0.83) when lowest and highest quintiles were compared. In women, the AHEI and aMED showed large reduction

Similar works

Full text

thumbnail-image
oai:CiteSeerX.psu:10.1.1.923.6024Last time updated on 11/1/2017

This paper was published in CiteSeerX.

Having an issue?

Is data on this page outdated, violates copyrights or anything else? Report the problem now and we will take corresponding actions after reviewing your request.