Journal of Regional and City Planning
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    436 research outputs found

    From Thousand Canals to Roads: The Transformation of Transportation Mode in Pontianak

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    Pontianak City was established in 1771 on the the Kapuas River and Landak River riverbanks, the latter being the longest river in Indonesia. The city was once known as the City of a Thousand Canals. However, in its development, people shifted to land transportation modes, leaving the canals in an extinction process. This study aimed to uncover the factors and impacts of the inland water transportation network fading from the Pontianak urban structure. The research used a sequential explanatory design, combining qualitative methods in the form of literature review and quantitative methods using space syntax analysis. By comparing the spatial configuration of the canals and roads in a diachronic approach, the study found proof of the importance of the canals’ existence in the Pontianak urban structure. Water transportation can be the answer to fixing environmental issues, flood hazards, and traffic congestion. Revitalizing the canals can help bring a healthy water environment because the people will change their perception of the canals from sewage routes to transportation routes. Revitalizing the canals can also bring back waterside activity, generate a sense of belonging, and bring back part of the former identity of Pontianak City

    Non-growers' perspectives on home gardening: Exploring for future attraction

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    To achieve urban sustainability, growing vegetables at home is a practical necessity. Understanding why people are hesitant to participate in urban vegetable growing is vital to reviving this practice. An in-person survey was conducted among 244 people who do not garden at home in Sri Lanka’s Colombo district to determine their perception of not gardening. Analysis was performed with exploratory factor analysis followed by binary logistic regression. According to the study, unrealized benefits and knowledge and experience challenges cause demotivation. The respondents had favorable attitudes toward urban agriculture; their interests appear to be aligned with urban agriculture and motivation should be able to entice them. The most viable way to attract them and ensure that they reap the economic and social benefits of urban home gardening appears to be to provide knowledge and hands-on experience. Younger people, private sector workers, and single homeowners are specific population segments that can be targeted for this motivation effort. The analysis further revealed that agriculture demonstrations in an urban setting inspire non-growers to practice urban agriculture

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    TransJakarta Service Evaluation in Controlling COVID-19 Transmission Using Twitter Sentiment Analysis

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    This study attempted to understand passenger perception of using public transport by utilizing Twitter data about the services of the TransJakarta Busway. Tweets were the main data source to capture users’ responses toward these services. Users’ perceptions were analyzed by sentiment analysis using a naïve Bayes algorithm. Furthermore, content analysis was used to inform improvements in service maintenance. The findings showed that the pandemic had a major impact on TransJakarta services, from a decrease in users, route closures, and fleet reductions to changes in user behavior. Most Tweets were negative regarding (1) poor bus frequency, leading to long queues and passenger overcrowding at bus stops and inside buses; (2) failure to maintain social distancing measures; (3) frequent violations of the 50% bus capacity reduction during peak hours, and showing a lack of consideration in measuring demand size during peak hours; (4) staff’s weak control of implementing the health protocol exacerbated poor services. This study suggests service improvement based on peak hour demand analysis to offset the implications of a 50% capacity restriction by providing proper bus frequencies and headway arrangements considerable enough to avoid crowding, followed by optimal monitoring of health protocol by staff. Tweet data may inform poor management in controlling the transmission of COVID-19 on public transportation. Hence, using Twitter data could replace conventional data collection methods like user interviews. Beneficial information from Tweet data can be captured at relatively low costs. Therefore, it may aid the evaluation of PPKM policy implementation to create more resilient public transportation during pandemics

    Factors Affecting Illegal Land-use Changes in Residential Areas: (Case Study: District 6 of Tehran)

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    Today, understanding the trend of land-use changes and its contributing factors is one of the important issues in urban land-use planning and urban management policies. Not all land-use changes comply with urban development plan regulations. Illegal land-use changes, especially in residential areas, are often implemented to reduce the municipality tax for small businesses in large cities in Iran. This trend has become a source of income for municipalities through fine acquisition. The objective of this study was to identify the factors contributing to incompatible and illegal land-use changes in the case study of District 6 in Tehran. The research method used in this study was descriptive-analytical. The data was collected using a questionnaire and a field study. The data were analyzed using the Pearson correlation test and confirmatory factor analysis using the equation modeling technique in the LISREL software. According to the research findings, escape from the traffic scheme zone, with a coefficient load factor of 0.86, and economic profitability, with a coefficient load factor of 0.84, were the most important factors motivating illegal land-use changes in the residential areas in this case study (District 6, Tehran). The main conclusion of this research is the need for change in Tehran urban policies for mitigation of urban planning violations. Specially in this case, the impact of the traffic scheme zone in Tehran should be considered. Another suggestion is the adoption of new urban policies related to taxes on unauthorized activities in residential areas that can counteract the market response to possible changes

    The Hubs of Transformation Dictated by the Innovation Wave: Boston as a Case Study: Exploring How Design is Emerging as an Essential Feature in the Process of Laboratorization of Cities

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    Cities have become nodes of global networks, standing at the intersection points of the flows of capital, goods, workers, businesses, and travelers, making them spots where innovation, progress and economic development occur. Design emerges as an essential feature in this process, which this manuscript defines as the ‘laboratorization of cities’, a cutting-edge urban development paradigm that emphasizes cities as dynamic laboratories for innovation and experimentation. This study explored the spatial hubs of transformation within the knowledge economy, providing an overview of the current models of innovation spaces before focusing on the innovation district of one of the cities that are riding the innovation wave, namely Boston, USA. Information was gathered from observations, exploratory interviews with key stakeholders, and on-desk data. The study has significant implications, spanning from informing global urban development strategies to impacting regional economic planning and national policies. It provides valuable insights into how design, innovation, and urban development are interconnected, potentially reshaping how cities and regions approach their growth in the current knowledge-driven era. Useful lessons can be drawn from the case study analysis, allowing to define valuable tools for policymakers, a forward-looking perspective on the future of the laboratorization of cities and the evolving role of design, providing a roadmap for cities aiming to position themselves as global innovation hubs

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    Physiological and Psychological Effects of Walking in Campus Landscape on Young Adults

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    Green space has a vital role in the community’s health and well-being. Forest bathing is an effective method of enjoying the forest atmosphere through physical activity or relaxing in a forest landscape. However, until now, no one has declared the benefits of forest therapy in Indonesia. This study clarifies the physiological and psychological effects of walking in a campus landscape. This research was conducted using experimental methods through physical activity survey, self-report questionnaires, Visitor Employed Photography (VEP), and automatic classification based on the image annotation API. The experiment was conducted in a park and an arboretum, and thirty-two young university subjects were tested. The participants walked for fifteen minutes on walking routes and district roads. Their blood pressure was measured before and after walking, and their heart rate was measured continuously. During the walk, the subjects took photographs of striking scenes using the Visitor Employed Photography method. Profile of Mood States (POMS) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were used to evaluate the psychological responses. Walking in the campus landscape resulted in a lower heart rate, less negative moods, and less anxiety than walking on the district road. Out of 837 photographs, 45% were taken from the Academic Event Plaza, 41.5% from the Arboretum, and the remaining 13.5% from district road, Jalan Raya Dramaga. Two main groups of campus green spaces included man-made landscape consisting of road surface, buildings, plant organs, stairs, and terrestrial plants; and natural landscape consisting of sky, trees, flowers, clouds, and plant community. This study found that walking in campus green space induced physiological and psychological health benefits and prominent landscape elements supported the green campus

    A Study of Green Infrastructure in European Cities: Opportunities and possibilities: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Green infrastructure (GI) is generally defined as a network of natural and semi-natural regions that has been sensitively developed and managed to provide an array of ecosystem services and improve people’s well-being. Across Europe, the notion of GI has had a robust association with the the impacts of climate change, multifunctionality, and green growth; this is especially true over the past ten years, from 2012 to 2022. This has resulted in a broad-based agenda on policy and research with vast differences, targeting a variety of themes and cultures. The systematic review and meta-analysis conducted in this paper present an up-to-date review of the main attributes of GI-related research and the implications for the member states within the European Union (EU). GI-related concepts, thematic clusters, and the main priorities within the research were considered in our review. Due to the ambiguity of the definition of GI, a broad diversity of research goals and published output are discussed. It was also seen that green spaces situated within urban areas and their related ecosystem services are the most common topics in the literature. Based on this, we recommend that an in-depth integration of the goals pertaining to nature conservation be conducted to understand how GI may pertain towards sustainable transitions in and outside the city

    Urban Planning Approach and Production of Counter Architecture: A Case Study of New Market, Khulna

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    Informal spatial practices in cities of the Global South are often regarded as activities taking place outside the realm of regulatory oversight. The prevailing urban governance and planning paradigms, which are largely derived from developed countries, struggle to adapt to the dynamic nature of these practices and the inherent conflicts they entail. Furthermore, the influence of disorderly political systems further complicates matters at the local level. In response to planned development, informal spatial practices persist as a critical yet overlooked/integral aspect of ever-evolving urban realities. This paper provides new insights into the current dynamics surrounding the creation of informal urban spaces in Global South cities and their interaction with the formal planning framework. Our study focused on the city of Khulna in Bangladesh, a compelling case study with a history of failed industrial planning dating back to the 1960s, when it was designed by a group of British consultants. Following its initial failure and the city’s subsequent decline in population, Khulna has witnessed an unforeseen surge in ‘counter spatial’ development driven by the imperative to meet socio-economic and cultural needs. This paper underscores the significance of such type of informal spatial production and introduces/highlights the concept of ‘counter architecture’ as a pivotal element of society that demands recognition and inclusion in the broader urban development framework. It suggests that the ‘counter architecture’ lens provides a foundation for challenging the rigidity of master planning and understanding the interconnectedness between formal and informal urban spaces. This perspective emphasizes the need to consider the lived experiences and tactical attributes of spatial formation, ultimately highlighting the resistance of ‘inhabitants’ and ‘users’ against the static codes of modern master planning in cities of Global South like Khulna

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    Journal of Regional and City Planning
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