UniSA Research Archive

    ATSIC Annual Report 1995-96

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    ATSIC Annual Report 1995-96

    Notable Lives

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    Profiles of 21 South Australians

    Australia Card [Folder Title]

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    This folder contains documents related to the 1987 proposal to introduce an Australia Card. Documents include: forms for direct mail to voters and a draft press release attacking the Liberal Party for opposing the Card; form for a petition in favour of the Card; correspondence from the Department of Health to Chris Hurford as Member for Adelaide setting out the Government’s position on the Card.

    Corporate social responsibility, noise, and stock market volatility

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    Organizational signals about corporate social responsibility may have a harmful impact on equity markets for two main reasons. First, corporate social responsibility is not systematically correlated with companies' economic fundamentals. Second, opportunistic managers are incentivized to distort information provided to market participants about their firms' corporate social responsibility. Either causal force, by itself, makes it difficult for market participants to interpret information about corporate social responsibility accurately. This greater noise in financial markets typically invites more noise trading, which in turn leads to excess market volatility (among all publicly traded firms) and, in a particular context of social-institutional processes and structures, to excess market valuations of firms that are widely perceived as socially responsible.

    Reconnection or disconnection : the influence of alternative education for marginalised students in the middle years of school

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    This thesis presents a research inquiry that focussed on the influence of alternative education for marginalised students in the middle years of school. The study was constructed from a social psychological perspective, drawing on an expectancy-value model of achievement. In acknowledging previous achievement-related experiences, investigating the influence of alternative education was crucial to further understanding how educational engagement and motivation could be improved for some of the most disenfranchised middle years students. Finally, this study illustrates the enduring influence of educational contexts and importantly, peer and teacher socialisers on educationally marginalised students’ achievement motivation, ability-, expectancy- and value- beliefs. These factors shape the achievement-related outcomes and subsequent trajectories of students in the middle years of school, providing the conduit to reconnect or disconnect learners from educational pathways.

    English language assessment in the context of policy innovation : a case study of how teachers interpret and manage assessment practices

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    The nature and level of complexity of this expansion are reflected in the first four findings of this study: (1) Teachers reframed their EL specialist roles to broaden students’ learning. Consistent with their reframed roles, they (2) expanded the EL learning and assessment constructs as well as (3) the range of elicitation and judging procedures used to assess the expanded constructs. While these findings on the nature of expansion were not without tension, the greatest tension was evident when (4) teachers addressed the level of complexity of the expansion by reconsidering assessment standards. A fifth finding was that (5) teachers functioned as a school-based EL assessment community to enable the expansion. In short, teachers worked in a conceptual and collaborative way to expand their EL assessment practices in order to enhance their students’ learning. The findings of the study are significant to the growing research field of AfL, and, equally, EL assessment in the following ways: (1) AfL requires a significant reframing of assessment roles for teachers; (2) AfL enables a qualitatively different learning experience for students; (3) AfL is contingent on a supportive policy context; (4) AfL includes school-based approaches; and (5) AfL needs to be considered and implemented in disciplinary terms.

    Modelling of unsteady flow in siphonic roof harvesting system

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    Siphonic roof drainage systems have been in existence for more than 40 years and are becoming an increasingly common element of urban drainage infrastructure. A siphonic system allows roof runoff to quickly reach its maximum flowrate. In contrast to a conventional system the siphonic approach to roof drainage aims to exclude air and to induce the full bore flow conditions required for siphonic action. This means that the filling and priming times are more efficient and quicker than for a conventional gravity-fed roof drainage system. Understanding the priming time of siphonic systems can help to identify potential problems in large systems that may not be able to fill and prime quickly enough to deal with high-intensity storms of short duration. The results from the work presented in this thesis will hopefully improve our understanding of the priming process in a siphonic roof drainage system and assist the water industry to move towards the use of unsteady flow models for design and performance modelling.

    Transparent costing: has the emperor got clothes?

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    Transparent Costing (TC) is a framework for determining the full indirect costs and thereby the full costs (FC) of Australian Competitive Grant (ACG) research projects; with the objective of ensuring the full funding of these projects by the government, so that they could be sustained in the long-run, and preventing their cross-subsidisation from other revenue sources. If a university wishes to be fully funded for its AGC research projects, it is mandatory to undertake a TC exercise and allocate the indirect costs of research activities. It was found in this study that whilst the objectives of FC appear worthwhile, FC may not prevent the practice of cross subsidisation. Also whilst it was found that Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing (TDABC) is preferable to ABC in the TC modelling of ‘research only’ departments and institutes; both approaches do not provide accurate information in ‘teaching and research’ departments. In these departments more accurate estimations could be obtained from studying the workload allocation methods and conducting direct interviews of the staff undertaking research on ACG and other externally funded grants. Crown Copyright 2010 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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