Durham Research Online

    Entertainment marketing and experiential consumption.

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    The placement of brand references within mainstream entertainment (called here ‘entertainment marketing’) is a rapidly evolving marketing communications field in its scale and sophistication. Much previous research in the field has conceptualized entertainment marketing as promotion and focused on measuring consumer attitudes, purchase intentions and brand recall in response to brand exposure. This conceptual paper suggests that there is also a need for understanding the quality of consumer engagement with brands in the context of mediated entertainment. The paper draws on phenomenological/existential research traditions in order to begin to theorize the role that entertainment marketing techniques may play in facilitating consumer self‐concepts and identity formation through brand exposure within dramatic portrayals of characters and lifestyles

    Dialoguing play (notes).

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    In 2004, Pat Kane published The Play Ethic: A Manifesto for a Different Way of Living (Macmillan), which went into mass-market paperback in September 2005. Pat’s commitment to bridging boundaries between the arts, sciences and social sciences to open up new possibilities for working, living and creating futures together struck a chord with the Department of Management Studies at the University of York, who appointed him Visiting Fellow in 2005. To inaugurate the appointment, on October 5th 2005 Pat presented a 90 minute overview of the ideas in the book, followed by a 90 minute seminar discussion. The questions and responses taken from the discussion were edited, reworked and updated by Pat (in between writing and recording a new Hue and Cry album) and the resulting text is presented here

    Milton's Ovidian Eve.

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    Milton's Ovidian Eve presents a fresh and thorough exploration of the classical allusions central to understanding Paradise Lost and to understanding Eve, one of Milton's most complex characters. Mandy Green demonstrates how Milton appropriates narrative structures, verbal echoes, and literary strategies from the Metamorphoses to create a subtle and evolving portrait of Eve. Each chapter examines a different aspect of Eve's mythological figurations. Green traces Eve's development through multiple critical lenses, influenced by theological, ecocritical, and feminist readings. Her analysis is gracefully situated between existing Milton scholarship and close textual readings, and is supported by learned references to seventeenth-century writing about women, the allegorical tradition of Ovidian commentary, hexameral literature, theological contexts and biblical iconography. This detailed scholarly treatment of Eve simultaneously illuminates our understanding of the character, establishes Milton's reading of Ovid as central to his poetic success, and provides a candid synthesis and reconciliation of earlier interpretations

    Language and theory of mind in autism spectrum disorder : the relationship between complement syntax and false belief task performance.

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    This study aimed to test the hypothesis that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) use their knowledge of complement syntax as a means of “hacking out” solutions to false belief tasks, despite lacking a representational theory of mind (ToM). Participants completed a “memory for complements” task, a measure of receptive vocabulary, and traditional location change and unexpected contents false belief tasks. Consistent with predictions, the correlation between complement syntax score and location change task performance was significantly stronger within the ASD group than within the comparison group. However, contrary to predictions, complement syntax score was not significantly correlated with unexpected contents task performance within either group. Possible explanations for this pattern of results are considered

    Representation of landscape hydrological connectivity using a topographically driven surface flow index.

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    This paper assesses the extent to which a topographically defined description of the spatial arrangement of catchment wetness can be used to represent landscape hydrological connectivity in temperate river catchments. A physically based distributed hydrological model is used to characterize the space-time patterns of surface overland flow connection to the drainage network. These characterizations are compared with a static descriptor of the spatial structure of topographically controlled local wetness, called here the Network Index. Theoretically, if topography is the primary control upon hydrological response, the level of catchment wetness required to maintain connectivity along a flow path should be greater for flow paths that have a lower value of the topographically controlled local wetness. We find that our static descriptor can be used to generalize a significant proportion of the time-averaged spatial variability in connectivity, in terms of both the propensity to and duration of connection. Although the extent to which this finding holds will vary with the extent of topographic control of hydrological response, in catchments with relatively shallow soils and impervious geology our index could improve significantly the estimation of the transfer of sediment and dissolved materials to the drainage network and so assist with both diffuse pollution and climate change impact studies. The work also provides a second reason for the concept that there are Critical Source Areas in river catchments: these arise from the extent to which that material can be delivered to the drainage network, as well as the generation of risky material itself

    Whose fear is it anyway ? resisting terror fear and fear for children.

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    Masks and madness : ritual expression of the transition to adulthood among Miskitu adolescents.

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    This article considers two forms of action among Miskitu adolescents, both of which encode in ritualised form anxieties and desires concerned with the imminent categorical transition from adolescence to adulthood. The first of these is a masked dance known as ‘mosko’ which is performed mainly by both young unmarried man and women in the village of Kakabila. The second is a supposedly culture-bound, and evidently contagious, condition known as ‘grisi siknis’ which afflicts mainly young unmarried women in Miskitu-speaking communities throughout eastern Nicaragua and Honduras. Analysis of this material suggests that where rituals directly enacting transformations to adulthood are absent, modes of action allowing individuals to express concerns surrounding this change of status are likely to be particularly dramatic

    Participatory geographies.

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    Fear, critical geopolitics and everyday life.

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    A general algorithm for detecting faults under the comparison diagnosis model.

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    We develop a widely applicable algorithm to solve the fault diagnosis problem in certain distributed-memory multiprocessor systems in which there are a limited number of faulty processors. In particular, we prove that if the underlying graph G = (V,E) forming the interconnection network has connectivity no less than its diagnosability δ and can be partitioned into enough connected components of large enough size then given a syndrome of test results under the comparison diagnosis model resulting from some set of faulty nodes of size at most δ, we can find the actual set of faulty nodes with time complexity O(ΔN), where Δ is the maximal degree of any node of the graph and N is the number of nodes
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