Technische Universität Dresden: Qucosa
Not a member yet
    12807 research outputs found

    Inklusiv digital: Gemeinschaft offen gestalten Selbstbestimmte Teilhabe an der digitalen Transformation: 26. Workshop GeNeMe‘23 Gemeinschaften in Neuen Medien

    Get PDF
    Die jährliche Konferenz GeNeMe „Gemeinschaften in Neuen Medien“ diskutiert insbesondere Online Communities aus integraler Sicht auf mehrere Fachdisziplinen wie Informatik, Medientechnologie, Wirtschaftswissenschaft, Bildungs- und Informationswissenschaft, sowie Sozial- und Kommunikationswissenschaft. Als Forum für einen transdisziplinären Dialog ermöglicht die GeNeMe den Erfahrungs- und Wissensaustausch zwischen Teilnehmenden verschiedenster Fachrichtungen, Organisationen und Institutionen mit dem Fokus sowohl auf Forschung als auch Praxis. Die GeNeMe 2023 öffnete sich insbesondere der Diskussion von Fragen rund um Inklusion und Teilhabe im Rahmen digitaler Formate und Innovationen. Dabei wurden unter anderem folgende Fragen reflektiert: Wie kann Inklusion durch Digitalisierung umgesetzt werden und welche Möglichkeiten zeichnen sich dafür ab? Wie kann Teilhabe an und durch Digitalisierung gelingen? Wie steht es um Architekturen und professionelle Skills im Kontext spezifischer Zielgruppen?:Inklusiv Digital: Gemeinschaft offen gestalten. Selbstbestimmte Teilhabe an und durch Prozesse der digitalen Transformation ... XXXIV Inclusive Digital: Shaping an open community. Selfdetermined participation in and through digital transformation processes ... XXXIX Community-Workshops der Vorkonferenz ...1 Eingeladene Vorträge ... 6 A Digital Education: AI ... 7 B Digital Health & Inclusion ... 44 C Digital World Global ... 80 D Digital Education: Health & Inclusion ... 126 E Digital Business & Administration ... 166 F Digital Education: Gamification ... 201 G Digital Education: A1 (2) ... 246 H Digital Education: OER ... 272 I Digital Interaction ... 300 J Digital Education: Competence Development ... 335 Autor:innenverzeichnis ... 37

    Ionometallurgy for low-temperature metal synthesis from metal oxides

    Get PDF
    Metals and valuable metal compounds are important parts of our everyday lives with applications ranging from aluminum foil over circuit boards to high-performance alloys for engineering and buildings construction. Large-scale metal production processes provide access to metals contained in numerous naturally occurring ores, earths and minerals and should be considered one of the major drivers of industrialization, leading to a continuous increase in living standards. Thereby, metals are often present in the form of oxides or other compounds of low reactivity and high stability. This makes metal extraction an often energy-intensive, environmentally problematic endeavor, relying on high reaction temperatures around 1000 °C or aggressive, corrosive and toxic chemicals. A disruptive, new approach for more sustainable metal production could be ionometallurgy, i.e., metal extraction by means of ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents (DESs). ILs, per definition, are salts with a melting point below 100 °C, while DESs are eutectic mixtures of two or more reagents with a melting point below that of the individual components. Both classes of materials feature favorable properties, such as a good solubility for many inorganic salts. Ionometallurgy is a seemingly simple approach, dissolving metal oxides at moderate temperature in an IL or DES and subsequently either electrodepositing the respective metal or producing valuable metal compounds by downstream chemistry. This thesis elucidated the general feasibility of the direct ionometallurgical metal production from metal oxides in two betaine-based solvents, namely the IL betainium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Hbet][NTf2]) and a DES consisting of betaine hydrochloride, urea and glycerol in the molar ratio 1 : 4 : 2.5 ([Hbet]Cl/4U/2.5GLY). Initial solubility studies involved a broad screening of the reaction behavior of numerous metal oxides with different properties regarding the position of the metal in the periodic table, its oxidation state as well as the basicity of the oxide. Exploiting the Brønsted-acidic functional group of the betainium cation, metal oxide dissolution in this case follows the principle of an acid-base reaction. Correspondingly, [Hbet][NTf2] favors the dissolution of basic or amphoteric metal oxides, while acidic metal oxides remain unaffected. In-depth investigations were performed for the examples of copper, cobalt and aluminum and identified the metal oxide lattice energy, the crystal structure and the reaction temperature as well as complex stabilities of the metal ions as additional factors to influence the solubility. How additives can affect the reaction outcome in multiple ways was shown for the example of chloride. In the copper system, small amounts of chloride act catalytically, while larger concentrations not only decrease the reaction time but also exhibit a structure-directing effect. For cobalt oxides, chloride is assumed to be reaction-driving due to the high chloride affinity of cobalt(II). These results were supported by seven new crystal structures found in the course of these investigations. Thereby, for the first time, metal oxide dissolution in [Hbet][NTf2] was systematically investigated under water-poor conditions. Abstaining from aqueous IL solutions, although water was shown to promote metal oxide dissolution, enables access to several metals via electrodeposition. This is facilitated by the large electrochemical windows of [Hbet][NTf2] and [Hbet]Cl/4U/2.5GLY, amounting to −2.0–1.4 V and −2.3–0.9 V, respectively. Copper, cobalt, nickel, tin, lead, zinc, and small amounts of vanadium were shown to be electrochemically reducible, whereas manganese, molybdenum and aluminum could not be electrodeposited within the electrochemical stability range of the IL or DES. For the deposition of the noble metal copper, the chloride content, the deposition temperature and additional organic solvents were identified as crucial parameters for the deposition potential as well as the quality of the deposit. By copper-coating a steel plate, a potentially industrially relevant application was demonstrated. Compared to the conventional industrial process for copper production, this ionometallurgical approach could imply a significant simplification and proceed at much lower reaction temperatures. Starting from tenorite or oxidic copper waste, copper coatings could directly be producible avoiding multiple process steps. Furthermore, the cobalt system revealed, that the thorough understanding of the complex equilibria present in solution is crucial for the successful electrodeposition of the metal. Thus, no deposits were obtained when anionic [CoCl4]2– was the predominant cobalt complex species. The adjustment of the cobalt-to-chloride ratio is a suitable method to generate sufficient amounts of cationic cobalt complexes, allowing for the deposition of the metal. Overall, several metals were directly produced from their oxides by the ionometallurgical approach at temperatures below 175 ℃. This means a significant temperature reduction compared to the conventional processes. Encouragingly, [Hbet][NTf2] already showed first promising results when applied to industrially relevant starting materials, such as black mass for the recycling of lithium ion batteries or bauxite as a highly relevant, naturally occurring aluminum resource. While this qualifies ionometallurgy in principle as a considerable improvement regarding process sustainability, the impact of [Hbet][NTf2] and [Hbet]Cl/4U/2.5GLY was analyzed in more depth. Thereby, the recyclability of the solvents is considered a very important factor for the efficient implementation of ionometallurgy in larger scale. First experiments in a two-compartment electrochemical cell showed that metals can be electrodeposited cathodically with a tailorable anode reaction. The oxygen evolution reaction in an aqueous electrolyte proved as suitable benign oxidation reaction in the anode half cell. The intactness of [Hbet][NTf2] after metal electrodeposition in this set-up was evidenced by NMR spectroscopy, qualifying the IL for reuse in principle. As opposed to this, decomposition reactions were identified to take place in both the IL and the DES. At 175 °C, [Hbet][NTf2] undergoes the chloride-induced decomposition via a Hunsdieker and a Deacon reaction, which is avoidable by a lower reaction temperature of 150 °C. NMR studies suggest that [Hbet][NTf2] does not decompose during the ionometallurgical process at this temperature. However, in the case of [Hbet]Cl/4U/2.5GLY, NMR and mass spectrometric studies proved the degradation via several decomposition pathways at 60 °C already. These decomposition reactions change the composition of the DES, which also affects the solubility of metal oxides. The thermal and chemical stability of [Hbet][NTf2] and [Hbet]Cl/4U/2.5GLY, besides other factors, have direct implications for their consideration as green solvents. Thus, [Hbet][NTf2] should only be used at reaction temperatures below 150 °C. Furthermore, its industrial application might be impeded by the expensive and toxic [NTf2]– anion. While betaine-based solvents can be easily accessible due to the natural abundance of betaine, the synthesis effort of the [NTf2]– anion makes [Hbet][NTf2] a considerably expensive IL. [Hbet]Cl/4U/2.5GLY is cheaper and easier to be synthesized from naturally abundant substances, yet not a considerable option due to its decomposition at low temperature already. Its thermal and chemical instability pose hardly surmountable obstacles regarding the recycling and the toxicity of [Hbet]Cl/4U/2.5GLY. Thus, both [Hbet][NTf2] and [Hbet]Cl/4U/2.5GLY do not qualify as green solvents and more benign alternatives should be found in the future. Altogether, this thesis showed that the ionometallurgical production of metals from their oxides is possible and, moreover, could be a sustainable alternative to conventional processes. The presented investigations extend our understanding of metal oxide chemistry in ILs or DESs and provide proofs of concept, laying a foundation for further work that leaves numerous opportunities for ongoing exploration and optimization. Hence, ionometallurgy could be one step to face the urgent challenge of climate change

    Radiogenomics machine learning analyses for treatment personalization of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Get PDF
    Cancer treatment personalisation is a major objective in radiation oncology, e.g., in order to move from population-based approaches towards tailored interventions such as dose escalation or de-escalation for specific patients or subgroups. HNSCC is a tumour entity that might particularly benefit from such an approach due to survival rates remaining relatively uniform over time even with multimodal treatment. A personalised approach requires biomarker identification to precisely characterize the tumour phenotype and thus prognosticate patient outcome and response to treatment. Biomarkers can be derived from a wide range of sources: clinical records of patients with semantic features, omics data from tumour biopsies indicating patient gene expression and routinely-taken imaging data from which radiomics features might be extracted. Such data can be then be leveraged alongside machine learning algorithms for modelling of various endpoints. The present thesis was dedicated not only towards establishing prognostic models within locally-advanced HNSCC but also towards a radiogenomic study of the relationship and interplay between image-level information and transcriptome-level information. First, two prognostic signatures for LRC within locally-advanced HNSCC were developed and externally validated through specific feature selection and modelling algorithms suggested through previous work (Leger et al, 2020). As biomarkers should take into account various sources of data, such signatures were built around a highly-prognostic clinical feature: the tumour volume. The selected features supplied statistical or textural information related to tumour heterogeneity and were chosen to provide non-redundant information to the tumour volume. Such an approach is aimed at providing added value to already-validated biomarkers and avoids susceptibilities within radiomics signature development (Welch et al.,2019) such as unspecified dependencies and multi-collinearity within models. One longstanding question within radiomics is the relationship between macroscopic-level image features and underlying biological processes (Aerts et al., 2014). In order to answer this question within the context of locally-advanced HNSCC and CT-based radiomics, surrogacy models were developed for six different gene signatures representing different tumour characteristics such as hypoxia or EMT. All modelling approaches showed low to no relationship between expression of such gene signatures and whole-tumour macroscopic imaging features. This might suggest that while whole-tumour radiomics has shown potential for prognostic endpoint modelling, such features may lack potential to serve as surrogates for local assessments of hypoxia or other microscopic tumour characteristics from a biopsy. While whole-tumour radiomics features may not be able to serve as surrogates for specific, microscopic-level tumour characteristics, they might still be used as surrogates for molecular subtyping within HNSCC as has been done in other tumour entities. Models for the classification of the four HNSCC subtypes (atypical, basal, classical and mesenchymal) were developed. Models differentiating the atypical subtype from the others and the atypical from the mesenchymal subtype were externally validated. As not all four subtypes could be properly classified, this might imply that some subtypes are more similar than others on a CT-level and that the atypical subtype would be the most differentiable subtype. As radiomics features showed low association with individual gene expressions, such omics features might be used to bolster radiomics features for LRC prognosis. However, due to the extremely high dimensionality of omics datasets in comparison to sample size, three methods for expression aggregation were leveraged to find either prognostic regulator genes with VIPER, prognostic coregulated gene modules (WCGNA) or prognostic pathway-level metagenes (GSVA). Enhancement of prognostic performance and stratification for LRC was found with the GSVA approach, through metagenes signifying E2F target activity and hedgehog pathway activity, and one WCGNA network module related to histone regulation. This result not only demonstrates the potential of transcriptomics to bolster radiomics but also of specific omics expression aggregation algorithms to synthesise new prognostic features. Finally, radiomics features were leveraged in order to create and externally validate radiophenotypes for HNSCC, creating five radiophenotypes that showed not only different imaging patterns but also different pathway-level expressions and prognosis for LRC and OS. Of those five radiophenotypes, three were able to be translated into an external validation cohort. However, not all translatable radiophenotypes showed similar stratification between cohorts for all endpoints. This, alongside with different expression levels between cohorts, might signify that one radiophenotype points to different levels of expression of different pathways, thus resulting in significantly different stratification for patients with similar imaging patterns. The field of radiogenomics analysis is, however, still in its infancy and offers a fascinating variety of open research questions for further consideration and study, e.g., promising deep-learning architectures such as transformers combining both image and tabular data (Park et al., 2022), multiomics biomarkers incorporating already-existing mechanistic knowledge (Yoo et al., 2022) or region-based radiomics risk assessments (Leger et al., 2020). While individualised treatment of patients is a daunting enterprise requiring a multidisciplinary approach, in this thesis we went a step closer to this goal for locally-advanced HNSCC:Contents iii List of Figures vii List of Tables ix 1 Introduction 1 2 Theoretical background 5 2.1 Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma 5 2.1.1 Diagnosis and treatment 5 2.1.2 Tumorigenesis 6 2.1.3 Molecular characteristics of HNSCC 7 2.1.4 Biomarkers in HNSCC 7 2.2 Physical principles of computerised tomography 10 2.3 Radiomics data 11 2.3.1 Feature extraction 12 2.3.2 Feature computation 12 2.3.3 Laplacian of Gaussian (LoG) 18 2.3.4 Image perturbations and stability 18 2.4 Transcriptomics data analysis 20 2.4.1 Weighted correlation gene network analysis 21 2.4.2 Virtual inference of protein-activity enriched by regulon 22 2.4.3 Gene Set Enrichment Analysis 24 2.4.4 Gene Set Variation Analysis 25 2.5 Fundamentals of survival analysis 27 2.5.1 Cox proportional hazards model 28 2.5.2 Assessing the proportional hazards assumption 29 2.5.3 Performance of survival models 30 2.6 Machine learning framework 32 2.6.1 Data preprocessing 34 2.6.2 Data resampling 36 2.6.3 Feature selection 36 2.6.4 Hyperparameter optimisation 38 2.6.5 Model building 39 2.6.6 Validation 41 3 Definition and validation of a radiomics signature for LRC prognosis in HNSCC 43 3.1 Motivation 43 3.2 Data and experimental design 44 3.2.1 Patient cohort 44 3.2.2 Clinical data 45 3.2.3 Radiomics features extraction and preprocessing 45 3.2.4 Modelling approach 46 3.3 Results 47 3.3.1 Clinical signature 47 3.3.2 Unwindowed signature 48 3.3.3 Windowed signature 50 3.3.4 Windowing effect comparison 52 3.4 Summary and discussion 52 4 CT radiomics surrogacy of gene signatures 55 4.1 Motivation 55 4.2 Data and experimental methods 55 4.2.1 Patient cohort 56 4.2.2 Transcriptome feature extraction 56 4.2.3 Radiomics features extraction and preprocessing 57 4.2.4 Selected gene signatures and class assignment 57 4.2.5 Modelling approach and metrics 58 4.3 Results 59 4.3.1 Cluster classes 59 4.3.2 Surrogate model performance 59 4.4 Summary and discussion 62 5 Radiomics signatures for HNSCC subtype classification 65 5.1 Motivation 65 5.2 Data and experimental design 66 5.2.1 Patient cohort 66 5.2.2 Radiomics image feature extraction 67 5.2.3 Subtype assignment and characterisation 67 5.2.4 Modelling approach 68 5.3 Results 68 5.3.1 Subtype assignment and characterisation 68 5.3.2 OVA model results 70 5.3.3 OVO model results 72 5.3.4 Multiclass model results 73 5.4 Summary and discussion 74 6 Enhancing radiomics using transcriptome-level information 77 6.1 Motivation 77 6.2 Data and experimental design 78 6.2.1 Patient cohort 78 6.2.2 WCGNA module extraction 79 6.2.3 VIPER regulon extraction 79 6.2.4 GSVA pathway feature creation 79 6.2.5 Radiomics image feature extraction 80 6.2.6 Modelling approach and metrics 80 6.3 Results 81 6.3.1 Radiomics signature 81 6.3.2 WCGNA results 82 6.3.3 VIPER results 85 6.3.4 GSVA results 86 6.4 Summary and discussion 87 7 Radiophenotype discovery through corrected consensus clustering in locally ad-vanced HNSCC 89 7.1 Motivation 89 7.2 Data and experimental design90 7.2.1 Patient cohort 91 7.2.2 Radiomics image feature extraction 91 7.2.3 Reduction and clustering of radiomics features 91 7.2.4 Candidate configuration pruning 92 7.2.5 Radiophenotype characterisation 92 7.2.6 Validation of subtypes 93 7.3 Results 93 7.3.1 M3C clustering results and survival-based pruning 93 7.3.2 Radiophenotype characterisation 95 7.3.3 Radiophenotype validation 100 7.4 Summary and discussion 102 8 Summary 105 9 Zusammenfassung 107 Bibliography 111 Appendix 131 Erklärungen 173Die Personalisierung der Krebsbehandlung ist ein wichtiges Ziel in der Radioonkologie, z.B. um von populationsbasierten Ansätzen zu maßgeschneiderten Interventionen wie einer Dosiseskalation oder Deeskalation für bestimmte Patienten oder Patientengruppen überzugehen. HNSCC ist eine Tumorentität, die von einem solchen Ansatz besonders profitieren könnte, da die Überlebensraten auch bei multimodaler Behandlung über der Zeit relativ konstant geblieben sind. Ein personalisierter Ansatz erfordert die Identifizierung von Biomarkern, um den Tumorphänotyp genau zu charakterisieren und somit den Behandlungserfolg vorherzusagen. Biomarker können aus einer Vielzahl von Quellen stammen: klinische Charakteristika von Patienten, Omics-Daten aus Tumorbiopsien, oder routinemäßig aufgenommene Bildgebungsdaten, aus denen Radiomics-Variablen extrahiert werden können. Diese Daten werden dann zusammen mit maschinellen Lernalgorithmen zur Modellierung verschiedener Endpunkte genutzt. Die vorliegende Dissertation widmet sich nicht nur der Etablierung prognostischer Modelle für lokal fortgeschrittene HNSCC, sondern auch einer radiogenomischen Untersuchung der Beziehung zwischen Informationen auf Bildebene und Informationen auf Transkriptomebene. Zunächst wurden zwei prognostische Signaturen für die LRC bei lokal fortgeschrittenem HNSCC entwickelt und extern validiert, unter Verwendung spezifischer Methoden zur Variablenselektion und Modellierungsalgorithmen, die durch frühere Arbeiten von Leger et al. (Leger et al., 2019) vorgeschlagen wurden. Die Signaturen wurden unter Berücksichtigung eines hochgradig prognostischen klinischen Merkmals, dem Tumorvolumen, entwickelt. Die ausgewählten Variablen beschreiben statistische oder strukturelle Informationen in Bezug auf die Tumorheterogenität und wurden so ausgewählt, dass sie zusammen mit dem Tumorvolumen nicht-redundante Informationen liefern. Ein solcher Ansatz zielt darauf ab, bereits validierten Biomarkern einen Mehrwert zu bieten und Anfälligkeiten bei der Entwicklung von Radiomics-Signaturen zu vermeiden (Welch et al., 2019), wie nicht-spezifizierte Abhängigkeiten und Multikollinearität innerhalb von Modellen. Eine langjährige Frage im Feld der Radiomics ist die Beziehung zwischen Bildvariablen auf makroskopischer Ebene und den zugrunde liegenden biologischen Prozessen (Aerts et al., 2014). Um diese Frage für lokal fortgeschrittene HNSCC und CT-basierte Radiomics zu beantworten, wurden Radiomics-basierte Vorhersagemodelle für sechs verschiedene Gensignaturen entwickelt, die unterschiedliche Tumorvariablen wie Hypoxie oder EMT repräsentieren. Alle Modellierungsansätze zeigten eine geringe Korrelation zwischen der Expression solcher Gensignaturen und makroskopischen Variablen der CT-Bildgebung des gesamten Tumors. Dies könnte darauf hindeuten, dass die Radiomics-Parameter zwar Potenzial für die prognostische Outcomemodellierung zeigen, jedoch möglicherweise nicht als Ersatz für die Beurteilungen von Hypoxie oder anderen mikroskopischen Tumoreigenschaften dienen können. Möglicherweise können Radiomics-Parameter jedoch als Ersatz für die molekulare Subtypisierung von HNSCC verwendet werden, wie dies bei anderen Tumorentitäten der Fall ist. Daher wurden Modelle für die Klassifikation der vier HNSCC-Subtypen (atypisch, basal, klassisch und mesenchymal) entwickelt. Erfolgreich validiert werden konnte die Unterscheidung zwischen dem atypischen Subtyp von den anderen sowie zwischen dem atypischen und mesenchymalen Subtyp. Dass jedoch nicht alle vier Subtypen richtig klassifiziert werden konnten, könnte bedeuten, dass einige Subtypen auf CT-Ebene ähnlicher sind als andere und dass der atypische Subtyp der am besten unterscheidbare ist. Da Radiomics-Variablen eine geringe Assoziation mit individuellen Genexpressionen zeigten, könnten solche Omics-Variablen verwendet werden, um Radiomics-Variablen für die LRC-Prognose zu ergänzen. Aufgrund der hohen Dimensionalität der vorliegenden Transkriptom-daten im Vergleich zur Stichprobengröße wurden drei Methoden zur Expressionsaggregation genutzt, um entweder prognostische Regulatorgene mit dem VIPER-Algorithmus, prognostische koregulierte Genmodule mit dem WCGNA-Algorithmus oder prognostische Pathway-Level-Metagene mit dem GSVA-Algorithmus zu finden. Eine Verbesserung der prognostischen Leistung und Stratifizierung für LRC wurde mit dem GSVA-Ansatz anhand von Metagenen, die E2F-Zielaktivität und Hedgehog-Pathway-Aktivität beschreiben, sowie für ein WCGNA-Netzwerkmodul, das sich auf die Histonregulation bezieht, beobachtet. Dieses Ergebnis zeigt nicht nur das Potenzial der Kombination von Transkriptomics und Radiomics, sondern auch von spezifischen Omics-Expressionsaggregationsalgorithmen zur Synthese neuer prognostischer Variablen. In der abschließenden Studie wurden Radiomics-Variablen genutzt, um Radiophänotypen für HNSCC zu erstellen und extern zu validieren. Fünf Radiophänotypen wurden definiert, die nicht nur unterschiedliche Bildgebungsmuster, sondern auch unterschiedliche Genexpressionen auf Pathway-Ebene sowie Unterschiede in LRC und OS zeigten. Von diesen fünf Radiophänotypen konnten drei in eine externe Validierungskohorte überführt werden, die dort jedoch teilweise eine andere Patientenstratifizierung für die betrachteten Endpunkte zeigten. Dies könnte, zusammen mit unterschiedlichen Expressionsniveaus zwischen den Kohorten, bedeuten, dass ein Radiophänotyp mit unterschiedlichen Expressionsniveaus verschiedener Signalwege assoziiert ist, was zu einer signifikant unterschiedlichen Stratifizierung für Patienten mit ähnlichen Bildgebungsmustern führt. Das Gebiet der radiogenomischen Analyse befindet sich noch in den Anfängen und bietet vielfältige offene Forschungsfragen für zukünftige Studien. Beispielsweise können vielversprechende Deep-Learning-Architekturen wie Transformer untersucht werden, die sowohl Bilddaten als auch tabellierte Daten kombinieren (Park et al., 2022). Weiterhin könnte die Multiomics-Biomarker-Entwicklung unter Einbeziehung bereits vorhandener mechanistischer Erkenntnisse untersucht (Yoo et al., 2022) oder die Radiomics-Risikobewertung basierend auf verschiedenen Tumorregionen (Leger et al., 2020) durchgeführt werden. Während die individualisierte Behandlung von Patienten ein langfristiges Ziel darstellt, das einen multidisziplinären Ansatz erfordert, sind wir diesem Ziel mit dieser Arbeit für lokal fortgeschrittene HNSCC einen Schritt näher gekommen.:Contents iii List of Figures vii List of Tables ix 1 Introduction 1 2 Theoretical background 5 2.1 Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma 5 2.1.1 Diagnosis and treatment 5 2.1.2 Tumorigenesis 6 2.1.3 Molecular characteristics of HNSCC 7 2.1.4 Biomarkers in HNSCC 7 2.2 Physical principles of computerised tomography 10 2.3 Radiomics data 11 2.3.1 Feature extraction 12 2.3.2 Feature computation 12 2.3.3 Laplacian of Gaussian (LoG) 18 2.3.4 Image perturbations and stability 18 2.4 Transcriptomics data analysis 20 2.4.1 Weighted correlation gene network analysis 21 2.4.2 Virtual inference of protein-activity enriched by regulon 22 2.4.3 Gene Set Enrichment Analysis 24 2.4.4 Gene Set Variation Analysis 25 2.5 Fundamentals of survival analysis 27 2.5.1 Cox proportional hazards model 28 2.5.2 Assessing the proportional hazards assumption 29 2.5.3 Performance of survival models 30 2.6 Machine learning framework 32 2.6.1 Data preprocessing 34 2.6.2 Data resampling 36 2.6.3 Feature selection 36 2.6.4 Hyperparameter optimisation 38 2.6.5 Model building 39 2.6.6 Validation 41 3 Definition and validation of a radiomics signature for LRC prognosis in HNSCC 43 3.1 Motivation 43 3.2 Data and experimental design 44 3.2.1 Patient cohort 44 3.2.2 Clinical data 45 3.2.3 Radiomics features extraction and preprocessing 45 3.2.4 Modelling approach 46 3.3 Results 47 3.3.1 Clinical signature 47 3.3.2 Unwindowed signature 48 3.3.3 Windowed signature 50 3.3.4 Windowing effect comparison 52 3.4 Summary and discussion 52 4 CT radiomics surrogacy of gene signatures 55 4.1 Motivation 55 4.2 Data and experimental methods 55 4.2.1 Patient cohort 56 4.2.2 Transcriptome feature extraction 56 4.2.3 Radiomics features extraction and preprocessing 57 4.2.4 Selected gene signatures and class assignment 57 4.2.5 Modelling approach and metrics 58 4.3 Results 59 4.3.1 Cluster classes 59 4.3.2 Surrogate model performance 59 4.4 Summary and discussion 62 5 Radiomics signatures for HNSCC subtype classification 65 5.1 Motivation 65 5.2 Data and experimental design 66 5.2.1 Patient cohort 66 5.2.2 Radiomics image feature extraction 67 5.2.3 Subtype assignment and characterisation 67 5.2.4 Modelling approach 68 5.3 Results 68 5.3.1 Subtype assignment and characterisation 68 5.3.2 OVA model results 70 5.3.3 OVO model results 72 5.3.4 Multiclass model results 73 5.4 Summary and discussion 74 6 Enhancing radiomics using transcriptome-level information 77 6.1 Motivation 77 6.2 Data and experimental design 78 6.2.1 Patient cohort 78 6.2.2 WCGNA module extraction 79 6.2.3 VIPER regulon extraction 79 6.2.4 GSVA pathway feature creation 79 6.2.5 Radiomics image feature extraction 80 6.2.6 Modelling approach and metrics 80 6.3 Results 81 6.3.1 Radiomics signature 81 6.3.2 WCGNA results 82 6.3.3 VIPER results 85 6.3.4 GSVA results 86 6.4 Summary and discussion 87 7 Radiophenotype discovery through corrected consensus clustering in locally ad-vanced HNSCC 89 7.1 Motivation 89 7.2 Data and experimental design90 7.2.1 Patient cohort 91 7.2.2 Radiomics image feature extraction 91 7.2.3 Reduction and clustering of radiomics features 91 7.2.4 Candidate configuration pruning 92 7.2.5 Radiophenotype characterisation 92 7.2.6 Validation of subtypes 93 7.3 Results 93 7.3.1 M3C clustering results and survival-based pruning 93 7.3.2 Radiophenotype characterisation 95 7.3.3 Radiophenotype validation 100 7.4 Summary and discussion 102 8 Summary 105 9 Zusammenfassung 107 Bibliography 111 Appendix 131 Erklärungen 17

    Catecholamine metabolism in pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas due to pathogenic variants in HRAS and its association with clinical practice

    Get PDF
    Phäochromozytome und Paragangliome (PPGL) sind seltene neuroendokrine Tumore, die von Chromaffinzellen im Nebennierenmark (Phäochromozytome, PCC) oder vom extra-adrenalen Paraganglion (Paragangliome, PGL) ausgehen. Patienten mit PPGL zeigen in der Regel Anzeichen und Symptome, die mit der Biosynthese, Speicherung und Sekretion von Katecholaminen (Dopamin, Noradrenalin, Adrenalin) zusammenhängen. Der Katecholamin-Stoffwechsel bei PPGLs wird durch den genetischen Hintergrund bestimmt. Tumoren, die auf pathogene Varianten (PVs) in Genen zurückzuführen sind, die zur Aktivierung von Hypoxie-Signalwegen führen, sind nicht in der Lage, Epinephrin zu synthetisieren, während solche, die auf PVs in Genen zurückzuführen sind, die Kinase-Signalwege aktivieren, zur Epinephrin-Synthese befähigt sind. Dieser genetisch-biochemisch-klinische Phänotyp wurde in der klinischen Forschung nachgewiesen. Der Mechanismus, der der Regulierung der Katecholamin-Biosynthese durch Tumoren aufgrund von PVs in Kinase-Signalisierungsgenen zugrunde liegt, ist jedoch nicht klar. Ziel dieser Arbeit war es, den Mechanismus der Katecholamin-Biosynthese in PPGLs aufgrund von PVs in HRAS, einem mit Kinase-Signalwegen assoziierten Gen, zu untersuchen. Darüber hinaus wurden klinische Merkmale wie Katecholamin-assoziierte Anzeichen und Symptome, die prächirurgische Diagnose und die Entwicklung einer wiederkehrenden Erkrankung bei Patienten mit PPGL untersucht. Um den Katecholamin-Stoffwechsel bei PPGL zu untersuchen, wurden Katecholamine und PNMT-Enzymaktivitäten in 251 PPGL-Geweben gemessen. Anschließend wurden zwei Hotspot-Varianten von Hras, G13R und Q61R, durch CRISPR/Cas9-basiertes Prime Editing in eine Phäochromozytom-Zelllinie (PC12) der Ratte eingeführt. Katecholamine und nachgeschaltete HRAS-Faktoren, die die Epinephrin-Biosynthese regulieren, wurden in den Zellen mit/ohne Hras-PVs gemessen. Wir fanden heraus, dass PPGLs, die auf HRAS-PVs zurückzuführen sind, einen signifikant höheren Epinephrin-Gehalt und PNMT-Enzymaktivitäten aufweisen als solche, die auf PVs in Genen zurückzuführen sind, die mit Hypoxie-Signalwegen in Verbindung stehen. In Zelllinienversuchen steigerten PVs in Hras die Pnmt-Expression zusammen mit einer erhöhten Epinephrin-Synthese. Weitere Experimente zeigten, dass Hras-PVs die Pnmt-Expression durch Phosphorylierung von SP1 über den MAPK-Signalweg hochregulieren. Darüber hinaus verringerten Hras-PVs die Glukokortikoidrezeptorspiegel, wodurch die Empfindlichkeit gegenüber der gGukokortikoid-induzierten Expression von Pnmt reduziert wurde. Drei separate klinische Projekte wurden durchgeführt, um die mit Katecholaminen verbundenen klinischen Merkmale zu verstehen. Das erste Projekt untersuchte die Unterschiede in der klinischen Behandlung und die perioperativen Komplikationen bei Patienten mit Harnblasen-Paragangliom (UBPGL), die vor der Operation diagnostiziert oder fehldiagnostiziert wurden. In diesem Projekt wurde mehr als die Hälfte (53,6 %) der Patienten mit UBPGL vor der Operation nicht diagnostiziert. Wie erwartet wurden Patienten, die vor der Operation fehldiagnostiziert wurden, kaum mit einer alpha-adrenergen Blockade behandelt, und mehr dieser Patienten erlitten während der Operation eine Bluthochdruckkrise und perioperative Komplikationen als Patienten, die vor der Operation richtig diagnostiziert wurden. Eine weitere Analyse ergab, dass bei 34,5 % der Patienten mit Katecholamin-assoziierten Symptomen und/oder Bluthochdruck vor der Operation keine UBPGL diagnostiziert wurde. Darüber hinaus wurde Bluthochdruck als unabhängiger Faktor identifiziert, der mit der präoperativen Diagnose von UBPGL assoziiert ist. Das zweite Projekt untersuchte die Unterschiede im Auftreten von Katecholamin-assoziierten Zeichen und Symptomen bei Patienten mit und ohne metastasiertem PPGL (mPPGL). Wir konnten zeigen, dass das Auftreten von Katecholamin-assoziierten Anzeichen und Symptomen bei Patienten mit mPPGL mit der Produktion von Noradrenalin verbunden war, während es bei Patienten ohne mPPGL mit Epinephrin zusammenhing. Allerdings unterschieden sich die Anzeichen und Symptome bei Patienten mit metastasiertem PPGL nicht signifikant von denen mit nicht-metastasiertem PPGL. Das dritte Projekt untersuchte das Wiederauftreten der Krankheit bei Patienten mit sporadischem PPGL. Wir konnten zeigen, dass ein noradrenerger/dopaminerger Phänotyp des Primärtumors bei Patienten mit sporadischem PPGL ein unabhängiger Prädiktor für ein Wiederauftreten der Erkrankung ist. Darüber hinaus zeigten wir, dass bei 14,7 % dieser Patienten ein Rezidiv auftrat, bei einigen sogar noch 10 oder 15 Jahre nach der Resektion des Primärtumors. Diese Arbeit zeigte anhand von klinischen Tumorgewebedaten und in vitro gentechnisch hergestellten Zellmodellen, dass die Epinephrinbiosynthese bei PPGL vorwiegend durch den genetischen Hintergrund aufgrund von PVs in HRAS reguliert wird. Klinische Studien haben gezeigt, dass das Auftreten von Anzeichen und Symptomen, die prächirurgische Diagnose und das Wiederauftreten der Erkrankung mit dem Katecholaminstoffwechsel bei Patienten mit PPGL in Zusammenhang stehen. Daher muss der Katecholaminstoffwechsel bei der klinischen Behandlung von Patienten mit PPGL unbedingt berücksichtigt werden.:Content III Abbreviations: V List of figures and tables VII Zusammenfassung 1 Summary 3 1 Introduction and outline of the thesis 5 1.1 Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas 5 1.2 Catecholamine metabolism in PPGLs 5 1.3 Pathogenic variants in the susceptibility genes of PPGLs 7 1.4 The association between genetic pathogenic variants and catecholamine metabolism in PPGLs 8 1.5 Catecholamine-associated clinical manifestations in patients with PPGLs 12 1.6 Catecholamine metabolite testing and diagnosis of PPGLs 12 1.7 Clinical treatment of patients with PPGLs 13 1.8 Follow-up for patients with PPGL 14 1.9 Outline of the thesis 15 2 Methods and results 17 2.1 Part 1: Regulation of epinephrine biosynthesis in HRAS-mutant paragangliomas 18 2.2 Part 2: Association of catecholamine metabolism and clinical management of patients with PPGL 67 2.2.1 Publication 1: 67 Differences in clinical presentation and management between pre- and postsurgical diagnoses of urinary bladder paraganglioma: is there clinical relevance? a systematic review 67 2.2.2 Publication 2: 74 Metastatic Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma: Signs and Symptoms Related to Catecholamine Secretion 74 2.2.3 Publication 3: 86 Recurrent disease in patients with sporadic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma 86 3 General discussion 95 4 Conclusion 99 5 References 100 6 Acknowledgements 108 7 List of journal articles and invited presentations 109 8 Appendix 111Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PPGLs) are rare neuroendocrine tumors derived from chromaffin cells within the adrenal medulla (pheochromocytomas, PCCs) or extra-adrenal paraganglia (paragangliomas, PGLs). Patients with PPGL normally present signs and symptoms that are associated with catecholamine (dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine) biosynthesis, storage, and secretion. Catecholamine metabolism in PPGLs is influenced by the genetic background. Tumors resulting from pathogenic variants (PVs) in genes that lead to activation of hypoxia signaling pathways are unable to synthesize epinephrine, whereas those resulting from PVs in genes that activate kinase signaling are capable of epinephrine synthesis. This genetic-biochemical-clinical phenotype has been revealed in clinical research. However, the mechanism behind the regulation of catecholamine biosynthesis in tumors due to PVs in kinase signaling genes remains unclear. Thus, this thesis aimed to investigate the mechanism of catecholamine biosynthesis in PPGLs due to PVs in HRAS, a gene associated with kinase signaling pathways. In addition, clinical features such as catecholamine-associated signs and symptoms, a presurgical diagnosis, and the development of recurrent disease in patients with PPGL were studied. To investigate the catecholamine metabolism in PPGLs, catecholamines and PNMT enzyme activities of 251 PPGL tissues were measured. Subsequently, two hotspot variants of Hras, G13R and Q61R, were introduced into a rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12) using CRISPR/Cas9-based prime editing. The levels of catecholamines and downstream factors of HRAS that regulate epinephrine biosynthesis were measured in the cells with/without Hras PVs. We found that PPGLs resulting from HRAS PVs had significantly higher epinephrine content and PNMT enzyme activities compared to those resulting from PVs in genes associated with hypoxia signaling pathways. Furthermore, in our cell line experiments, PVs in Hras increased Pnmt expression, along with increased epinephrine synthesis. Moreover, further experiments indicated that Hras PVs upregulated Pnmt expression through phosphorylation of SP1 via the MAPK pathway. In addition, Hras PVs decreased glucocorticoid receptor levels, thereby reducing sensitivity to glucocorticoid-induced expression of Pnmt. Three separate clinical projects were performed to better understand the clinical features associated with catecholamines. The first project investigated the differences in clinical management and per-operative complications between patients with urinary bladder paraganglioma (UBPGLs) who were correctly diagnosed and those who were misdiagnosed before surgery. In this project, more than half (53.6%) of the patients with UBPGL were not diagnosed before surgery. As expected, patients who were misdiagnosed before surgery received limited treatment with alpha-adrenergic blockade, resulting in a higher incidence of hypertension crisis during surgery and perioperative complications compared to patients diagnosed before surgery. Further analysis indicated that 34.5% of these patients presenting with catecholamine-associated symptoms and/or hypertension were not diagnosed with UBPGL before surgery. In addition, we identified hypertension as an independent factor associated with pre-surgical diagnosis of UBPGLs. The second project analyzed differences in the presentation of catecholamine-associated signs and symptoms in patients with and without metastatic PPGL (mPPGL). We showed that the presentation of catecholamine-associated signs and symptoms was associated with the production of norepinephrine in patients with mPPGL, whereas in non-mPPGL patients, it was associated with epinephrine. However, the signs and symptoms in patients with metastatic PPGLs did not significantly differ from those in patients with non-metastatic PPGL. The third project analyzed recurrent disease in patients with sporadic PPGL. We showed that a noradrenergic/dopaminergic phenotype of primary tumors was an independent predictor of recurrent disease among patients with sporadic PPGL. In addition, we showed that 14.7% of these patients experienced recurrent disease, with some cases occurring even 10 or 15 years after the resection of their primary tumors. This thesis, through the use of clinical tumor tissue data and in vitro genetically engineered cell models, indicated that epinephrine biosynthesis was predominantly regulated by the genetic background in PPGLs with PVs in HRAS. Additionally, clinical studies showed that the presentation of signs and symptoms, a pre-surgical diagnosis, and the presence of recurrent disease were associated with catecholamine metabolism in patients with PPGL. It is therefore imperative to consider catecholamine metabolism in the clinical management of patients with PPGL.:Content III Abbreviations: V List of figures and tables VII Zusammenfassung 1 Summary 3 1 Introduction and outline of the thesis 5 1.1 Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas 5 1.2 Catecholamine metabolism in PPGLs 5 1.3 Pathogenic variants in the susceptibility genes of PPGLs 7 1.4 The association between genetic pathogenic variants and catecholamine metabolism in PPGLs 8 1.5 Catecholamine-associated clinical manifestations in patients with PPGLs 12 1.6 Catecholamine metabolite testing and diagnosis of PPGLs 12 1.7 Clinical treatment of patients with PPGLs 13 1.8 Follow-up for patients with PPGL 14 1.9 Outline of the thesis 15 2 Methods and results 17 2.1 Part 1: Regulation of epinephrine biosynthesis in HRAS-mutant paragangliomas 18 2.2 Part 2: Association of catecholamine metabolism and clinical management of patients with PPGL 67 2.2.1 Publication 1: 67 Differences in clinical presentation and management between pre- and postsurgical diagnoses of urinary bladder paraganglioma: is there clinical relevance? a systematic review 67 2.2.2 Publication 2: 74 Metastatic Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma: Signs and Symptoms Related to Catecholamine Secretion 74 2.2.3 Publication 3: 86 Recurrent disease in patients with sporadic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma 86 3 General discussion 95 4 Conclusion 99 5 References 100 6 Acknowledgements 108 7 List of journal articles and invited presentations 109 8 Appendix 11

    Environment-Adaptive Localization based on GNSS, Odometry and Lidar Systems

    Get PDF
    In this thesis, an extension of the existing localization system of the ABSOLUT project is presented, with the aim of making it more resistant to GNSS errors. This enhanced system is based on the integration of a LiDAR sensor. Initially, a 3D map of the traversed route is created using the LiDAR sensor. This process employs an existing factor graph-based SLAM algorithm, which is made more stable and accurate through the inclusion of a surveyed elevation profile of the environment, the integration of vehicle odometry sensors, and bias estimates of the IMU. The generated map is used during the drive to determine the vehicle's position by comparing it with the currently captured point clouds. This procedure relies on a newly developed Error-State Kalman Filter that fuses LiDAR odometry with absolute LiDAR position estimates. To optimally use the pose estimation from the various sensor systems, an approach is proposed that adaptively combines the estimates based on the environment. The performance of the developed system is evaluated using real driving data

    Development of a Thioredoxin-Based Cofactor Regeneration System for NADPH-Dependent Oxidoreductases

    Get PDF
    Nicotinamide cofactor-dependent oxidoreductases have become a valuable tool for the synthesis of high value chiral compounds. The feasibility of biocatalytic processes involving these enzymes stands and falls with the efficiency of the regeneration of cofactors. In this study, we describe a novel NADPH regeneration method based on the natural thioredoxin electron delivery system. Thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) and thioredoxin reductase (TR) from Thermus thermophilus were characterized for the dithiol-dependent reduction of NADP+, revealing good catalytic activities and a particularly remarkable thermostability. The TR/Trx1 system was then coupled with two representative NADPH-dependent oxidoreductases, alcohol dehydrogenase and cyclohexanone monooxygenase. Reaction conditions for both systems were optimized for reaction yield and selectivity. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the TR/Trx1-system for its application as NADPH regeneration system

    Numerische und experimentelle Untersuchungen zu den Spannungsumlagerungen von ermüdungsbeanspruchten Betonbauteilen im Very-High-Cycle-Fatigue Bereich

    Get PDF
    Ein zentraler Baustein zur Reduktion von CO2-Emissionen ist der Ausbau der erneuerbaren Energien, insbesondere der Windenergie. Forschungsbedarf besteht dabei bei der ressourceneffizienten Herstellung der Turmstrukturen. Bei Nabenhöhen von über 100 Metern sind Hybridtürme aus vorgespannten Stahlbetonsegmenten die geeignetste Konstruktion. Hierfür ist jedoch eine genaue Kenntnis des Ermüdungsverhaltens von Beton erforderlich. In der Literatur existieren überwiegend Untersuchungen an kleinformatigen zylindrischen Probekörpern, deren Ergebnisse nur bedingt auf die großmaßstäblichen Bauteile übertragen werden können. Im Rahmen dieses Vorhabens wurden daher zum einen Großversuche mit zyklisch biegebeanspruchten, vorgespannten Betonbalken sowie Begleitversuche an zylindrischen Probekörpern und zum anderen numerische Simulationen der Balkenversuche durchgeführt. Das numerische Materialmodell wurde aufbauend auf einem additiven Dehnungsmodell im Finite-Elemente-Programm ANSYS Mechanical in einem iterativen Berechnungsablauf implementiert. Die Betondehnungen setzen sich hierbei aus vier Anteilen zusammen, einem elastischen, einem plastischen, einem viskosen und einem Temperaturdehnungsanteil. Somit konnte der kombinierte Einfluss der Anteile auf das Ermüdungsverhalten von Beton dargestellt werden. In den Großversuchen konnte bei den Balkenprobekörpern ein Ermüdungsversagen der Betondruckzone erzeugt werden, das sich an dieser Stelle durch Risse parallel zur Drucknormalspannung sowie teilweises Abplatzen der Betondruckzone, die der größten Spannungsschwingbreite ausgesetzt war, einstellte. Es zeigte sich, dass dies erst nach deutlich mehr Lastwechseln eintrat als bei den axial beanspruchten Betonzylindern in den zyklischen Begleitversuchen mit derselben Spannungsschwingbreite. Dies ist auf die Spannungsumlagerung zurückzuführen, die im Querschnitt aufgrund der ermüdungsbedingten Materialdegradation und Steifigkeitsverringerung der stark beanspruchten Randbereiche stattfand. In den Begleitversuchen wurden die Materialparameter für das numerische Modell ermittelt, mit dem im Anschluss die Balkenversuche nachgerechnet wurden. Es konnten die in den Versuchen beobachteten Effekte der Steifigkeitsdegradation und Spannungsumlagerung und die daraus resultierende Lebensdauerverlängerung nachgebildet werden. Das Modell kann somit für weitergehende Lebensdaueruntersuchungen von ermüdungsbeanspruchten Betonbauteilen verwendet werden.:ABSCHLUSSBERICHT 1 Allgemeine Angaben 2 Zusammenfassung / Summary 3 Wissenschaftlicher Arbeits- und Ergebnisbericht 4 Veröffentlichte Projektergebniss

    Need for cognition and burnout in teachers – A replication and extension study

    Get PDF
    Burnout has become more prevalent, mainly in social jobs, and there is evidence that certain personality traits protect against burnout. Only recently, studies have focused on investment traits like Need for Cognition (NFC), the stable intrinsic motivation to seek out and enjoy effortful cognitive activities. This study had three aims: First, the replication of findings by Grass et al. (2018), who investigated NFC and the burnout subscale reduced personal efficacy in student teachers, in a sample of 180 teachers. Second, investigating the role of perceived demands and resources in the context of NFC and burnout. And finally, creating an exploratory model for further research. The results indicated that unlike the student sample, the teachers’ association of NFC and reduced personal efficacy was mediated by self-control but not reappraisal. Teachers with higher NFC and self-control also had lower burnout because they experienced their resources as fitting to the demands

    Sekundärnutzung deutscher Medikationsdaten in internationalen Studien unter Wahrung der semantischen Bedeutung

    Get PDF
    Elektronisch verfügbare Daten aus der Gesundheitsversorgung, sogenannte Real-World Data (RWD), gewinnen zunehmend an Bedeutung für die Forschung, insbesondere in der Pharmakovigilanz und der Arzneimittelsicherheit. Die Schaffung von kollaborativen Forschungsnetzwerken, wie beispielsweise Observational Health Data Sciences and Informatics (OHDSI) oder European Health Data and Evidence Network (EHDEN) stoßen auf positive Resonanz, um die Potenziale von RWD zu nutzen und die Reproduzierbarkeit und Verlässlichkeit von Forschungsergebnissen retrospektiver Beobachtungsstudien zu verbessern. Eine Beteiligung deutscher Universitätskliniken mit RWD der stationären Versorgung fehlt bisher, vor allem weil die qualitativen Eigenschaften der Medikationsdaten aktuell eine Hürde darstellen. In dieser Arbeit wird daher untersucht, wie die Sekundärnutzung von Medikationsdaten der klinischen Versorgung in retrospektiven Beobachtungsstudien in internationalen Forschungsgemeinschaften am Beispiel von OHDSI unter Wahrung der semantischen Bedeutung ermöglicht werden kann. Initial wird ein Scoping Review durchgeführt, um zu ermitteln, wo die Schwerpunkte der Nutzung des Datenmodells Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP) derzeit liegen. Es werden die Anforderungen an die Daten in OMOP seitens der Forschungsgemeinschaft OHDSI ermittelt und mit dem IST-Zustand der Medikationsverordnungen am Beispiel des Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus Dresden (UKD) abgeglichen. So werden die Inhibitoren identifiziert, welche im Widerspruch zu den Anforderungen stehen. Korrektive Maßnahmen zur Reduktion der Inhibitoren werden konzipiert, umgesetzt und anschließend quantitativ und qualitativ bewertet. Zudem untersucht die Arbeit, wie eine notwendige Transparenz möglicher, verbleibender Limitierungen gewährleistet werden kann. Das durchgeführte Scoping Review zeigt eine über die vergangenen Jahre stetig zunehmende Bedeutung des Datenmodells OMOP für die Durchführung von Studien unter Verwendung von Daten aus mehreren Ländern. In Deutschland fokussiert sich die Forschung im Kontext OMOP bislang auf die Betrachtung von Trends, des Datentransfers, Mappings und der Entwicklung von Konzepten. Eine aktive Beteiligung an der Durchführung von Studien mit medizinischen Fragestellungen unter Nutzung von OMOP findet aktuell nicht statt. Zur Verwendung von Medikationsverordnungen in OMOP müssen die Daten strukturiert und unter Verwendung von internationalen Terminologien wie ATC und RxNorm vorliegen. Allerdings zeigt eine Analyse über mehrere Standorte in Deutschland, dass Medikationsverordnungen überwiegend unstrukturiert und ohne belastbare Zuordnung standardisierter, internationaler Klassifikationen dokumentiert werden. Dieses Ergebnis bestätigt sich auch bei der Untersuchung der Medikationsverordnungen des UKD der Jahre 2016 bis 2020. Die in dieser Arbeit entwickelten und durchgeführten Maßnahmen wurden abgeleitet aus der Teilnahme an einem Pilotprojekt der European Medicines Agency (EMA) und fokussieren auf der Verbesserung der Datenstruktur sowie der Überführung der Medikationsverordnungen nach RxNorm. So konnte der Grad der Klassifizierung der Medikationsverordnungen des UKD unter Verwendung der Standard-Terminologie RxNorm von initial 0% auf 66,39% erhöht werden. Des Weiteren wird durch eine interaktive Visualisierung der Datenstruktur und des Grades der Überführbarkeit von ATC Codes nach RxNorm eine Transparenz der Ergebnisse geschaffen. Die Beantwortung aller in dieser Arbeit gestellten Forschungsfragen schafft die Voraussetzung, um zukünftig an retrospektiven Beobachtungsstudien der OHDSI Forschungsgemeinschaft teilzunehmen zu können. Die semantische Bedeutung der Medikationsverordnungen, auch unter Verwendung internationaler Terminologien wie RxNorm, bleibt dabei gewahrt. Zusätzliche Transparenz kann Forschenden und Versorgenden helfen, die Datenqualität im Sinne der Strukturiertheit der Medikationsverordnungen am UKD in Zukunft bereits zum Zeitpunkt der Entstehung zu verbessern.:Zusammenfassung V Abstract VII Symbole und Abkürzungen XV 1 Einleitung 1 1.1 Motivation 1 1.2 Offene Herausforderungen 5 1.3 Ziele und Fragestellungen der Arbeit 7 1.4 Struktur der Arbeit 8 2 Hintergrund 9 2.1 Datenintegrationszentrum 9 2.2 Medizininformatik Initiative Kerndatensatz 10 2.3 OMOP Common Data Model 12 2.4 ATHENA und Standardisierte Vokabulare 14 2.5 OHDSI ETL Werkzeuge 14 2.6 OHDSI Data Quality Dashboard 15 2.7 Relevante Terminologien 17 2.7.1 Die Anatomisch-Therapeutisch-Chemische (ATC) Klassifikation 17 2.7.2 RxNorm 19 3 Materialien und Methoden 21 3.1 Material 21 3.1.1 Verwendete Daten 21 3.1.2 Datentransfer 25 3.1.3 Infrastruktur 27 3.2 Literaturrecherche 28 3.2.1 Identifikation von Publikationen 29 3.2.2 Einschluss und Ausschluss von Publikationen 29 3.2.3 Kategorisierung von Publikationen 30 3.3 Anforderungsanalyse 31 3.3.1 Anforderungen seitens des Datenmodell OMOP 32 3.3.2 Analyse Studienprotokolle von OHDSI Studien 32 3.4 Identifikation von Inhibitoren 35 3.4.1 Stichprobenanalyse von Routinedaten an MIRACUM Standorten 35 3.4.2 Systematische Analyse der Medikationsdaten am UKD 36 3.5 Maßnahmen zur Reduktion der Inhibitoren 37 3.5.1 Maßnahmen am Beispiel einer EMA Studie 38 3.5.2 Maßnahmen - Datenstruktur 40 3.5.3 Maßnahmen - Terminologie 44 3.6 Bewertung der Maßnahmen 49 3.7 Schaffung von Transparenz 52 4 Ergebnisse 55 4.1 Ergebnisse Literaturrecherche 55 4.1.1 Allgemeine Übersicht 56 4.1.2 Fachliche Themen 57 4.1.3 Zeitliche Entwicklung 60 4.1.4 Geografische Verteilung 61 4.1.5 Überblick der Publikationen deutscher Universitäten 63 4.1.6 Zusammenfassung der Ergebnisse der Literaturrecherche 68 4.2 Soll Zustand gemäß Anforderungsanalyse 68 4.2.1 Anforderungen seitens OMOP Datenmodell 69 4.2.2 Anforderungen OHDSI Netzwerkstudien 71 4.2.3 Zusammenfassung der Ergebnisse der Anforderungsanalyse 73 4.3 Identifizierte Inhibitoren 73 4.3.1 Ergebnisse der Stichprobenanalyse 73 4.3.2 Ergebnisse der systematischen Analyse 75 4.3.3 Zusammenfassung der identifizierten Inhibitoren 76 4.4 Ergebnisse der Reduktionsmaßnahmen 76 4.4.1 Ergebnisse der Maßnahmen am Beispiel einer EMA Studie 77 4.4.2 Ergebnisse der Maßnahmen - Datenstruktur 79 4.4.3 Ergebnisse der Maßnahmen - Terminologie 88 4.4.4 Zusammenfassung der Ergebnisse der Maßnahmen 95 4.5 Ergebnisse der Bewertung 95 4.5.1 Ergebnisse der qualitativen Bewertung 95 4.5.2 Ergebnisse der quantitativen Bewertung 97 4.5.3 Zusammenfassung der Ergebnisse der Bewertung 99 4.6 Ergebnisse zur Transparenz 100 4.6.1 Transparenz Datenstruktur 101 4.6.2 Transparenz Terminologie 102 4.6.3 Zusammenfassung der Ergebnisse zur Transparenz 104 5 Diskussion 105 5.1 Allgemein 105 5.2 Stärken 110 5.3 Limitierungen 114 5.4 Ausblick 116 Literaturverzeichnis 138 Abbildungsverzeichnis 140 Tabellenverzeichnis 142 A Anhang: Quellcode Readme 143 B Anhang: drug-exposure Tabelle - Wiki Dokumentation 149 C Anhang: Studienprotokoll EMA Studie 151 D Anhang: Medikationsverordnungen ATC Codes Strukturiertheit 163 E Anhang: ATC-GM Vokabular 181 F Screenshots DQD Dashboard 183 Erklärung zur Eröffnung des Promotionsverfahrens 185 Bestätigung über Einhaltung der aktuellen gesetzlichen Vorgaben 18

    Automated fabrication of cell-instructive synthetic sulfonated and sulfated hydrogels

    Get PDF
    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the highly hydrated, protein- and glycosaminoglycan- (GAG) based cell environment that provides cell-instructive cues like the mechanical stabilization of the cells and transmission of biochemical and physical signals. To biochemically and mechanically mimic the ECM, hydrogels with the highly negatively charged GAG heparin in interplay with a stabilizing polymer network are of high interest in biomaterial engineering. The application as cell-instructive materials allows for controlling transport processes of signaling molecules within the matrices, cell growth and differentiation behavior, and cellular fate decisions. In particular, heparin-based biomaterials enable targeted sequestration of signaling molecules on the one hand, but also sustained delivery of them with a lower necessary amount to be used, in contrast to the discontinuous application of solutes. In addition, heparin-based biomaterials can protect the loaded cargo from enzymatic degradation and conformational changes.[1]–[3] The affinity to signaling molecules as key feature provides the potential for applications in wound healing and tissue regeneration. Synthetic sulfonated polymers (SSPs) as synthetic heparin analogs can address multiple drawbacks of native heparin, such as its heterogeneous chemical structure and the potential risk of viral contamination from the animal isolation source.[4],[5] Due to a large number of molecular design opportunities in particular the degree of sulfation, sulfate volume concentration, sulfate or sulfonate nature, distance of the sulf(on)ate from the backbone, and hydrophobicity of the polymers, biochemical processes may be controlled in a targeted manner. The chemical possibilities for forming a hydrogel network based on SSPs are far more diverse with synthetic, freely designable polymers to achieve a targeted structure and chemical nature of the network. Here, the aim was to introduce a library of SSPs to replace heparin in fully synthetic hydrogels capable of modulating cell-instructive cues such as soluble factor signaling, adhesiveness, and growth behavior of integrated cells. Accordingly, a library of systematically varied SSPs differing in degree of sulfation, sulfate or sulfonate conjugation, hydrophobicity, and sulf(on)ate distance to the backbone have been synthesized from by polymer analog reaction of various sulf(on)ated amines with a polyacrylate (15 kDa, sodium salt) as the polymeric backbone. The polymers have been thoroughly characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled light scattering analysis, and microscale thermophoresis (MST) for their molecular composition, stability in aqueous solution, conformation, and interaction with a chosen signal molecule. The affinity of the very stable coiled polymers under physiological conditions to signaling molecules depends mainly on the degree of sulfation, sulfate or sulfonate nature, and hydrophobicity. The SSPs are crosslinked with 4-arm star-shaped poly(ethylene glycol) (starPEG) either directly to form amide-crosslinked hydrogels or by pre-functionalization via Michael-type addition to prepare cell-instructive hydrogels, each with graded mechanical properties. The affinity of these hydrogels for various signaling molecules can be quantified compared to heparin-based ones and attributed to the influence of the degree of sulfation, sulfate volume concentration, sulfate or sulfonate nature, and hydrophobicity. The potential of SSPs in functional 3D tissue cultures could be confirmed by renal morphogenesis and neural network formation in the corresponding hydrogels by collaborators. Further on, the synthesis procedure of hydrogel precursors has been transferred to fully automated procedures. Because standardized production of cell-instructive hydrogels at low compositional and batch-to-batch variation and material compliance can benefit from high-throughput synthesis and liquid handling robots. An automated multistage workflow was developed to synthesize hydrogel precursors, carry out hydrogel formation, and execute cell culture experiments with cells embedded in the hydrogels. The protocol combines two robotic liquid handling systems and a microscope for automated sample imaging and cell analysis. The customized heparin and SSP maleimidation procedures, including temperature-regulated synthesis, purification, and aliquotation, were implemented on a customized liquid-handling robot. The resulting hydrogel precursors were analyzed for their maleimide conjugation efficiency and purity by 1H-NMR and conductivity measurements and for their hydrogel formation ability. This automated synthesis can ensure the quality and production of good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant hydrogel materials. Automated SSP hydrogel preparation, cell culture, and analysis can further promote combinatorial approaches to biomedical applications of cell-instructive materials. References [1] Lohmann, N.; Schirmer, L.; Atallah, P.; Wandel, E.; Ferrer, R. A.; Werner, C et al. Glycosaminoglycan-Based Hydrogels Capture Inflammatory Chemokines and Rescue Defective Wound Healing in Mice. Sci. Transl. Med. 2017, 9 (386), 1–12. [2] Schirmer, L.; Atallah, P.; Werner, C.; Freudenberg, U. StarPEG-Heparin Hydrogels to Protect and Sustainably Deliver IL-4. Adv. Healthc. Mater. 2016, 5 (24), 3157–3164. [3] Liang, Y.; Kiick, K. L. Heparin-Functionalized Polymeric Biomaterials in Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery Applications. Acta Biomater. 2014, 10 (4), 1588–1600. [4] Blossom, D. B.; Kallen, A. J.; Patel, P. R.; Elward, A.; Robinson, L.; Gao, G. et al. Outbreak of Adverse Reactions Associated with Contaminated Heparin. N. Engl. J. Med. 2008, 359 (25), 2674–2684. [5] Hirsh, J.; Dalen, J. E.; Anderson, D. R.; Poller, L.; Bussey, H.; Ansell, J. et al. Oral Anticoagulants. Chest 1998, 114 (5), 445S-469S

    12,634

    full texts

    12,808

    metadata records
    Updated in last 30 days.
    Technische Universität Dresden: Qucosa is based in Germany
    Access Repository Dashboard
    Do you manage Open Research Online? Become a CORE Member to access insider analytics, issue reports and manage access to outputs from your repository in the CORE Repository Dashboard! 👇