Georgia Southern University

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    The George-Anne Inkwell Edition

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    Charlie Smith

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    https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/willowhillheritage-obituaries/6011/thumbnail.jp

    Development of a Novel Measure to Assess for Alcohol Misuse in Older Adults: The Alcohol Misuse Scale for Older Adults (AMSOA)

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    Alcohol is the most regularly used intoxicating substance in most geographic locations. Alcohol use in the United States specifically is well over global averages. While alcohol misuse is generally considered to be understood as a problem for younger adults, it is often unrecognized and understudied older adult populations. Currently, there is an absence of a comprehensive tool measuring for developmentally salient behaviors, symptoms, and features of alcohol misuse in older adulthood, which blocks researchers’ ability to measure alcohol misuse well. The purpose of this study is to develop a psychometrically valid and reliable assessment of alcohol misuse for older adult populations. Three separate studies were conducted to evaluate the psychometric properties of the developed measure. Using an exploratory factor analysis, the first study identified a suitable two-factor structure of misuse. Content of identified factors aligned closely with the notion of adverse outcomes and drinking intention. The second study used a confirmatory factor analysis to confirm the two-factor structure. Results revealed solid to good fit to the data. Finally, the third study evaluated internal consistency and convergent validity for the two-factor structure. Results highlight strong reliability estimates and meaningful correlations with theoretically related constructs, including depression, health, and general alcohol use. These findings suggest the developed measure is a robust assessment for alcohol misuse in older adult populations. Results also detected mixed findings related to demographic differences (i.e., gender identity, rural status) in reports of alcohol misuse dimensions. Most interestingly, in the third study older adult men residing in rural areas report higher scores on the misuse dimensions than older adult men residing in urban areas. The opposite appears to be true for women. Overall, these findings extend the literature related to alcohol misuse for older adult populations by offering a novel measure to assess for developmentally salient behaviors. It will be important for future researchers to determine how the developed measure can be used to direct treatment consideration with older adult populations

    Mary L. Reid Black

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    https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/willowhillheritage-obituaries/6819/thumbnail.jp

    Mamie O. Smith

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    https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/willowhillheritage-obituaries/6642/thumbnail.jp

    Rose Mary Sanders

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    https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/willowhillheritage-obituaries/6849/thumbnail.jp

    At-Risk Children: Adult Perception and Recognition of Mental Health Concerns

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    Approximately 20% of children ages nine to 17 in the United States struggle with mental health concerns each year (Gamm et al., 2010). Early identification of child and adolescent mental health concerns is crucial for initiating treatment to prevent recurrence or persistence of pathology into adulthood (Logan & King, 2001). Children are primarily dependent upon adults in their lives (e.g., parents/caregivers, education professionals, healthcare providers) to recognize mental health concerns and seek services (Sayal et al., 2010). Providing these adults with guidance on how to appropriately identify and recognize these mental health needs in children is critical (Crouch et al., 2019). Despite this well-documented mental health crisis in children/adolescents, there is a marked delay in or underutilization of services (Reinke et al., 2011), suggesting a barrier to service attainment. The current study aimed to investigate this barrier by examining adults’ recognition and response to at-risk or “pink flag” behaviors/symptoms of externalizing or internalizing concerns in a fictitious child. The study used vignettes depicting a child with various psychological concerns (i.e., externalizing, internalizing, or none-control) and then assessed the adult’s ability to recognize presented concerns and their likelihood to refer for services. Participants who received either experimental vignette (externalizing or internalizing) reported higher likelihood to refer for services and those who were healthcare providers were the highest reporters (compared to parents and education professional). This study has strong clinical implications for those who have or work with children and/or in the field of teaching/education or developmental psychopathology

    Midweek Memo

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    Applaud Remember Share Experience You May Have Hear

    Hattie Beola Postell

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    https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/willowhillheritage-obituaries/6557/thumbnail.jp

    The George-Anne Inkwell Edition

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